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REESE LIBRARY 

Augusta College 
Augusta, Georgia 



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in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/rainbow19351935acad 



The Nineteen Thirty-Five 

RAINBOW 




PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENT BODY OF THE 

JUNIOR COLLEGE of AUGUSTA 

IN COLLABORATION WITH STUDENTS OF THE 

ACADEMY of RICHMOND COUNTY 

VOLUME NINE 

AUGUSTA 
GEORGIA 



CONTENTS 



PART ONE 
PART TWO 
PART THREE 
PART FOUR 
PART FIVE 
PART SIX 
PART SEVEN 
PART EIGHT 
PART NINE 
PART TEN 
PART ELEVEN 
PART TWELVE 



School of Administration 

Faculty 

J. C. A. Sophomores 

J. C. A. Freshmen 

Academy Seniors 

Lower Classes 

Superlatives 

Military 

Fashion & Beauty 

Athletics 

Activities 

Features 




FOREWORD 



THE staff of "The Rainb* 

tempting to give to the Graduating Classes a 
yearbook that adequately befits the dignity of 
our One Hundred and Fifty - Two Year -Old 
Academy, and that illustrates the prestige and 
rank of our Junior College. 

Our theme is that of School Life as portrayed 
by our cover. We trust that our efforts will 
se r ve as a permanent source of pleasure in re- 
calling to you, your friends and activities of 
1934-5. 



C/ ' Vr. (friaries c-/Nsberry Koyslon 



WITH a full realization of the invaluable services 
rendered to our schools; as a patient and helpful in- 
structor in the classroom, as a tireless and efficient 
coach on the athletic fields, and as a ready friend at 
all times, the student bodies of the Junior College 
of Augusta and the Academy of Richmond County 
gratefully dedicate_ this issue of "The Rainbow" 
to Mr. Charles Asberry Royston. 




Mr. Charles Asberry Royston 



THE RAINBOW 935 



r 










THE RAIN 







Direct View of Main Entrance 




Campus and Building in Backgruond 






TH AINBOW 35 





Front View of Auditorium 







■ ". f: 






Front View of Building in First Year of Use 




Rear View of Auditorium 



THE RAINBOW 1935 






I he I residents I ace... A r\essooe to You 



To the boys and girls of the Junior College and Academy: 

My dear young friends: 

My message to you this year has been expressed by Charles 
E. Whelan, in his poem . . . "What makes Life." 

"Not length of days nor span of years; 

Not vain regrets nor hopeless tears; 
Not faint heart when a storm appears- 

This does not make life. 

"Not easy drifting with the tide; 

Not halting when the visions ride; 
Not mourning for the gifts denied- 

This does not make life. 

"To fill the time with thought and deed; 

To find in faith the joyous creed; 
To lose oneself in another s need- 

These make life. 

"To strive where adverse currents hold; 

To make our dreams their truths unfold; 
To smile at fate with courage bold- 

These make life." 

May you strive day by day to make your life worth while 
and to bring joy and happiness into the lives of those with 
whom you have daily contact. This is my sincere wish for you 



Your friend, 

A. -L>. Skinner 



THE RAINBOW 1935 




President James Lister Skinner 









e/N /Messaoe from Your Uean 



Q B Q B fE3 S 



CHOICES 



Dear Fellow-students: 

The totality of life consists of a series of alternate choices. This is an inescap- 
able fact in all human experience. You must choose between the sordid and the beau- 
tiful, between the false and true, between the selfish and the unselfish, between sham 
and sincerity, between hypocrisy and integrity. 

Out of these choices you will construct finally for yourself a philosophy of life 
and evolve rules of conduct. The kind of philosophy which you adopt and to which you 
adhere will determine the pull on your life, whether downward toward the base and con- 
fusion, or upward toward higher moral and intellectual levels. Where would you rather 
dwell? You must make the choice. At least you may remember that what at the 
bottom of the mountain of your opportunity seems prosaic and confused, when viewed 
from the heights above, falls into patterns of matchless beauty and symmetry. 

May you respond to the challenge of the unsealed heights! 

Faithfully yours, 



i^ric \0o. <jtawif 



TH 




Dean Eric W. Hardy 



THE RAINBOW 19G 



Board of Trustees 

BRYAN CUMMING PRESIDENT 

JOHN PHINIZY VICE-PRESIDENT 

WARREN BOTHWELL SECRETARY-TREASURER 

LANDON THOMAS E. C. B. DANFORTH, )K. 

FERDINAND PHINIZY W. MONTGOMERY HARRISON 

Officers of Board of Education 

FREEMAN C. McCLURE PRESIDENT 

H. L. MURPHEY VICE-PRESIDENT 

S. D. COPELAND SEC. AND SUPT. OF SCHOOLS 

High School and Junior College Committee 

MRS. BEN E. LESTER. Chairman MRS. JOHN W. WALKER 

MRS. GEO. H. UMECKER MR. J. T. FENDER 

MR. R. F. MOORE MR [. O. STALLINGS 



THE RAINBOW 




rACULTY 






THE INBOW 935 



OUR FACULTY 

The annual staff wishes here to pay 
tribute to the members of the faculty who 
have untiringly labored to enhance the value 
and glory of our student enterprises. Our 
athletic teams, debating teams, and school 
publications have prospered very largely, we 
feel, because of the support and ever-ready 
cooperation of our teachers. 









THE RAINBOW 1935 



FACULTY OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 




KATHARINE P. BOGGS. B. S. 
Education 

Graduate of Birmingham Normal Training School; B. S., Columbia University, 1920; 
Special Diploma, "Supervisor in Training Schools," Columbia University, 1920; Graduate 
Student, Columbia University, one summer session; University of Georgia, one summer ses- 
sion; Director, Training School for Teachers, Augusta, Ga.; Instructor in University of Ten- 
nessee Summer School, 1921-1922-1923; The Junior Colbg-3 of Augusta, 1926. 






JULIA A. FLISCH, A. M., ADVISOR OF WOMEN 
History 

Graduate of Lucy Cobb Institute, A. M. (Honorary) University of Georgia, 1899; Graduate 
Student, Harvard University, one summer session; University of Chicago, three summer 
sessions; University of Virginia Summer School, 1931; A. M., University of Wisconsin, 1908; 
Teacher' Georgia Normal and Industrial College, 1893-1905; Executive Clerk, Extension 
Division, University of Wisconsin, 1905-1907; Secretary, Economics Department, University 
of Wisconsin, 1907-1908; Teacher, Tubman High School, 1908-1926; Teacher, University o: 
Georgia Summer Session, 1905, 1912, 1913, 1923; The Junior College cf Augusta- 1926. 




ELENORA KATHLEEN MERTINS 

Tubman High School, 1920-1923; Miss Funk's Business College, 1923-1924; Secretary i 
Manager Augusta Ice & Coal Company, 1924-1934; Secretary to President, Academy cr. 
Junior College, 1934. 



ERNEST MASON ALLEN, Ph. B. 
English — French 

Ph. B., Emery University, 1926; Student instructcr in Frer.ch at Emory University, 1925-26; 
Academy of Richmond County, 1926. 





A. EDWIN ANDERSON 
English — German 

A. B., Vanderbilt University, 1928; M. A., Vanderbilt University, 1929; Teaching Fellow 
in English, Vanderbilt University, 1929-1930; Assistant in French, Vanderbilt University, 
1930-31; Instructor in French, Vanderbilt University, 1931-32; Graduate Student, Harvard 
University, 1932-33; M. A., Peabody College, 1934; Junior College of Augusta, 1934-35; 
Member Phi Beta Kappa and Kappa Delta Pi 



JUSTIN A. H. BEGUE, B. S., 
French 



B. A. 



B -S., B. A., Paris University, 1907; Instructor in Mathematics and Modern Languages, 
Cairo (Egypt) College; Modern Languages, College of Ouimper (France), 1913-1914; Modern 
Languages, College Leconte de Lisle, 1917-1920; Senior High School- Mahanoy City, Pa., 
1921-1923; Academy of Richmond County, 1923-1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



£ 















FACULTY OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 






G. L. BOLTON 
Math and Science 

B. S., Emory University, 1926; Cuthbert High School, 1926-1927; Principal, Jesup High 
School, 1927-1928; Cartersville High School, 1928-1930; A. R. C, 1930-. 



MARION TURNER BRYSON, A. B. 
Science 

A. B.. Gordon Institute, 1909; Emory University, 1911; Instructor, Hillsboro High School, 
1909-10; Bostick High School, 1911-12; Buckhead High School, 1912-14; Tennille High 
School, 1915-17; A. R. C, 1917-. 



JAMES MORGAN BUCKNER, B. S.. M. S. 
Mathematics 

B. S., Clemson College, 1910; M. S., University of Wisconsin, 1916; Principal, Rockville, 
S. C, 1913; Principal, Brunson, Ga, 1910-12; A. R. C. 1922- 



O'NEAL W. CHANDLER, A. B. 
Science 




A. B., University of Georgia, 1922; 
Academy of Richmond County, 1925-. 



Instructor, Waynesboro High School, 1923-24; The 



CHARLES GUY CORDLE, A B„ A. M. 
History and German 

A. B., Trinity College (Duke University), 1914; A. M., Trinity College, 1915; Summer 
School, Columbia University, 1917; Summer School, Emory University, 1930; Summer School 
University of Georgia, 1933; Student Assistant in Latin, Trinity College, 1913-1915; Graduate 
Assistant in German, Trinity College, 1914-1915; Instructor, Baird's School for Boys, 1915-16; 
Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1916-1926; Director, Summer School, The Junior 
College of Augusta, 1931-1932; Head of History Department, The Academy of Richmond 
County, 1922-1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 







GEORGE M. DASHER 
Shop 

Graduate of The Academy of Richmond County; Teacher of Carpentry in A. R. C, 1924-. 




fife 



JOHN THOMAS HAINS, B. S. in Education 
Mathematics 

Graduate, Academy of Richmond County, 1910 and 1911; B. S., Education, University of 
Georgia' 1915; Graduate Student, University of Georgia, 1920-1921, also during one summei 
session; Instructor, Albany High School, Albany, Ga., 1915-1917; Commandant of Corps of 
Cadets and Instructor, Athens High School, 1920-1922; Superintendent, Swainsboro High, 
Swainsboro, Ga., 1922-1923; Commandant of Corps of Cadets, Academy of Richmond County, 
1923-1926; Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1923; The Junior College of Augusta. 









FACULTY OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 






CHARLES MARTIN ETHEREDGE, A. B. 
English 

A. B., Newberry College, 1923; Principal Waverly Consolidated High School' Waverly, 
Ga., 1923-1924; Superintendent, Cape High School, Cape, S. C, 1926-1927; A. R. C, 1927-. 



JOHN EVANS EUBANKS, A. B., A. M. 
Latin — Government 

A. B., Wofiord College, 1916; A. M.. Wofford College, 1916; A. M., Columbia University, 
1927; American Academy in Rome, Summer 1929; Instructor Textile Industrial Institute, 
Spartanburg, S. C, 1915; Instructor, Academic High School, Columbus, Ga., 1916-1917; 
.,1. leave of absence for graduate work, at Columbia University, session 1932-1933; Academy 
of Richmond County. 1919-1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



WILLIAM D. EVE 
Mechanical Drawing 

Biology Department; Graduate Work at Tulane University, 1934; Secretary, Boys Work in 
local Y. M. C. A., 1934; The Academy of Richmond County, 1934. 



GEORGE W. EWING 
Mathematics 

B. S., Presbyterian College, 1933; Student instructor at Presbyterian College in 
Biology Department; Graduate Work at Tulane University, 1934; Secretary, Boys' Work in 
local Y. M. C. A., 1934; The Academy of Richmond County, 1934. 

NORMAN L. GALLOWAY, B. S.. M. A. 
Education and Economics 

Student Union University, Jackson, Tenn., 1919; Western Kentucky State Teachers' Col- 
lege, 1922; Superintendent of Schools, Farmington, Ky., 1922-26; B. S., Murray State Teacher's 
College, 1927; Supervisor of Rural Schools, McCracken County, Ky.- 1926-27; Superivisor 
Rural Schools, Graves County, Ky., 1927-28-29; M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers, 
1929; Instructor Summer College Junior College of Augusta. 1929; Superintendent of 
Schools, I.a Center, Ky., 1929-30; Instructor, The Junior College of Augusta, 1930. 






ROBERT EMIL GRESSETTE 
History 

A. B., University of South Carolina, 1931; A. R. C 



LUTHER ALFRED GRIFFIN, B. S. A.. M. S. 
Botany 

B. S. A., University of Georgia, 1922; M. S., University of Michigan, 1931; Science In- 
structor, Waycross High School, 1922-23; Head of Science Department, Waycross High 
School, 1923-1925; Science Instructor, Marietta High School, 1926-1927; Science Instructor, 
Academy of Richmond County, 1927-1932; The Junior College of Augusta, 1932. 




THE RAINBOW 1935 



FACULTY OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 




JOHN BURCHELL MOORE, A. B. 
English 

A. B., University of South Carolina; Eight years cf teaching experience in Georgia, 
Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina; A. R. C, 1929-. 



j. george Mcdonald, ph. b. 

Mathematics 

Ph. B„ Emory University, 1915; Prinicipal, Greensboro High School, 1915-1016; Lakeland 
(Fia.l High School, 1916-1918; Kentucky Military Institute, 1918-1820; A. R. C, 192G-. 





DAVID FRANKLIN McDOWELL- A. B. A. 
Spanish 



M. 



k 



A 



A. B., University of Florida, 1924; A. M., University of Florida, 1928; Summer School, 
Ui iversity of North Carolina, 1929-1930-1931; Traveled in Spain, summer of 1932; Teaching 
Fellow, University of North Carolina, 1930-1931; Teacher, Lake City, Fla., High School, 1924- 
1925; Teacher, Miami, Fla., High School, 1926-1927; Teacher, John Gorrie Junior High Schoc", 
Jacksonville, Fla.' 1928-1929-1930; Instructor in French and Spanish, Extension Divisicr, 
University of Florida, 1928-1929, 1929-1930; The Junior College of Augusta, 1931. 



AUBURN G. OWENS, A. B. 
English — History 

A. B., University of Georgia, 1925; Graduate Student, University of Georgia, 1925-1926; 
Irstructor- Waynesboro High School, 1925-1928; A. R. C, 1928. 







HENRY OSGOOD READ, Ph. B., A. M. 
English 

Ph. B., Emory Uriversity, 1916; A. M., Emory University, 1918; A. M., Colu-nbia Univer 
sity, 1925; Special Diploma, "Supervisor of English-" Columbia University, 1925; Graduate 
Work, University of California, 1931; Fellow in English, Emory University Academy, 1917- 
1918; Prinicipal, Dawson (Ga.l High School, 1919-1921; Superintendent, Dawson Public 
Schools, 1921-1922; Head of English Department, Academy of Richmond County, 1922-1926; 
Head of Department of English, The Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



GEORGE H. RIDGWAY, A. B. 
Chemistry 

A. B.- University of Georgia, 1922; Summer School, University of Georgia, 1923-1933; 
Pensacola (Fla.) High School, 1923-1924; Gainesville Struby School, 1921-1926; A. R. C, 
1927. 




THE RAINBOW 



FACULTY OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 







JOHN MARSHALL ELLIS, A. B.- M. S„ Ph. D. 
Biology 

A. B., Emory University, 1924; M. S., Emory University, 1926; Ph. D., University of 
California, 1934; Graduate Fellow in Biology, Emory University, 1924-1926; Professor of 
Biology, Southern College, Lakeland, Fla.- 1924-1926, (Partial Sessions); Graduate Work, 
Marine Biology Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., Summer 1929; Graduate Work, University 
of California, Summer 1931; on leave to the University of California 1932- 1933; The 
Junior College of Augusta, 1926. 



HUGH JOHNSON 
Commercial 

Graduate, Academy of Richmond County, 1930; Student Instructor in Commercial V/oik 
from 1930 to 1934; With Augusta Herald since 1920; A. R. C. 1934. 



WILLIAM REDDING KENNEDY 
Commercial 

Georgia Ncrmal College- 1904; Zanerian College, Columbus, Ohio, 1908; Professor South 
Georgia College, 1906-1909; Rome High School, 1912-1913; Extension work at Georgia 
19-1-1923,- A. R. G, 1913-. ' 



J. C. LUCKY 

Mathematics 

B. S., Commerce, University cf Georgia, 1927; Summer Graduate Work, U. ive-'ity of 
Georgia, 1932; Fourth District A. & M., Carrollton, Ga., 1927-1933; A. R. C. 



WILLIAM LEROY MADEN, A. B., A. M. 
French 

A. B., Tusculum College, 1926; Assistant Principal, St. James High School, ' Greenville, 
Tennessee, 1926; Principal- St. James High School, 1927-1928; Graduate Student, Duke 
University, 1926-1929; A. M., Duke University, 1930; The Junior College of Augusta, 1930. 



ANTON PAUL MARKERT, B. S. in C. E., M. A. 
Mathematics and Drawing 

B. S. in C. E„ Georgia School of Technology, 1921; M. A.- Columbia University, 1929; 
Graduate Student, University of Chicago, summer 1925; Instructor, Academy of Richmond 
County, 1921-1926; The Junior College of Augusta, 1926 



CHARLES HAROLD MITHCELL, A. B., M. A. 
English — Education 

A. B., University of Pittsburgh, 1918; M. A. University of Pittsburgh, 1931; Professional 
College Teachers Life Certificate, State of Georgia, 1933; Holder of Honor Scholarship, U-i- 
verstiy of Pittsburgh, 1914-1918; Cadet Captain and Assistant in Instruction, R. O. T. C, 
University of Pittsburgh, 1917-1918; Graduate of F. A. C. O. T. S., Camp Taylor, Kentucky- 
1918; Second Lieutenant, Field Artillery, U S. Army, 1918; Cross of Service, U. D. C, 1926; 
Rcadway Accountant, Virginia Railway- 1919-1920; Student, Washington ard Lee University, 
1915-1916; Graduate Student, Harvard University, one semester, 1922-1923; Graduate Student, 
Summer School, Universtiy of Pittsburgh, 1926-1929, 1931; Graduate Student, Summer School- 
Duke University, 1933; Instructor, Academy of Richmond County Summer School, 1930-1931; 
Instructor, Academy of Richmond County, 1920; The Junior College of Augusta- 1928. 









THE RAINBOW 



935 



FACULTY OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 




JOE MAYS ROBERTSON, B. S. 
English — Civics 

B. S., Clemson College,- Principal and Instructor, Public Schools of Pickens County, S. C, 
1921-1925; Superintendent of Schools at Saluda- S. C, 1925-1928; A. R. C, 1928-. 





CHARLES ASBURY ROYSTON, B. S. 

B. S., University of Georgia, 1922; Taught at Florida High School, 1922-1923; Louisville 
High School, 1923-1924; Marietta High School, 1924-1926; Cordele High School, 1926-1927; 
Cainesville High School, 1927-1929; A. R. C- 1929-. 



GEORGE MILTON SCOTT, A. B., B. Lit., M. A. 
English 

A B., University of Chattanooga, 1922; B. Lit. in Journalism, Columbia University, 1926; 
M. A.- Duke University, 1934; Summer School, Columbia University, 1923, 1926; A. R. C, 
1922-24, 1926; Junior College of Augusta, 1933-. 



CHESTER ARTHUR SCRUGGS, A. B. 
Chemistry 

A. B., Mercer University, 1911; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, Summer 1925- 
1926; Principal, Marshallville High School, 1911-1913; Principal, Round Oak High School- 
1913-1916; Principal, Ashburn High School, 1916-1917; Director- Summer School, A. R. C, 
1918-1924; A. R. C. 1917-; J. C. A. 1926. 

CHESTER McKENLEY SUTTON, A. B., A. M. 
English 

A. B., Guilford College, 1918; A. B., Haverford College- 1919; A. M., University of North 
Carolina, 1924; Graduate Study, University of North Carolina, Summer of 1925; year of 
1925-1926; Duke University Summer School, 1931, 1933; Principal- Manteo High School, 
1919-1920; Principal, Bona Vista High School, 1920-1922; Principal, Leggett High School, 
1922-1923; Principal, Mount Pleasant High School, 1924-1925; Duke University Summer 
School- 1931, 1933, 1934; Instructor in English, University of North Carolina, 1925-1926; 
Head of Department of English, Piedmont College Summer School of 1926; The Junior 
College of Augusta, 1926. 



BENJAMIN ROY SMITH 
Physics 

A. B., Wofford College, 1919; Taught at Carlisle Preparatory School, 1922-1924; A. R. C, 
1924-; A. R. C., 1934-. 







JOSEPH LE CONTE TALLEY, B. 
Physics 



S.- M. S. 



B. S., University of Georgia, 1923; M. S., Mercer University, 1925; Columbia University 
Summer School, 1928; Graduate Assistant in Physics and Mathematics, Mercer University, 
1923-24; Instructor in Physics, Mathematics and Drafting, 1924-25; Head of Physics Depart- 
ment in Mercer University Summer School, 1926; A. R. C. 1926; J. C. A. 1926-. 









THE RAINBOW 



This Page is Dedicated in Loving 



Memory of a Member of Our Faculty 



Who Passed on Into the Great Beyond. 



JAMES CHAPMAN SHERMAN 



July 12, 1904 



Sept. 7, 1934 




ALLEN 
SCOTT 
GRESSETTE 



O. C. AND J. L. 
SKINNER 

DASHER 



HAINS 
EWING 

Mcdowell 



r "* *** 



■i 



ALBUM 








MmmmMmimiimEmMmmmMmmMiimmmM 



l!llllll!:illllllllll'l!llllllllliiiiiiniii muni 



ETHEREDGE 


TALLEY 


EUBANKS 


READ 


ELLIS 





CHANDLER 

MADEN (on right) 
GALLOWAY 



SOMETHING ON TEACHERS 






I crawled to the top of the hill and looked out across the field beyond, concealing myself, as I did so, from 
the view of any person that might be on the opposite knoll. About three miles to the front, I saw a man moving 
around. I shaded my eyes from the burning sun. Private McDunzy touched me on the shoulder and offered a 
pair of field glasses. I took them and adjusted the focus. The powerful binoculars brought the image of the man 
up to within thirty feet. He was equipped for playing golf and had a golf sack engraved with the name Chester 
Sutton swung over his shoulder. The man was about a hundred feet from the golf cup. He looked around ner- 
vously to see if any people were in sight; and since none revealed themselves to his vision, he sighed in relief and 
drew from the golf bag a broom, which he used hurriedly, with the air of a professional, to sweep the ball across 
the intervening distance into the cup. 

This is the ston- of three wise scientists: Georgie, Chester, and Josey. 

Georgie grew up in the foot hills of the Cherokee state, but the governor defies anyone to prove it. Any- 
way, Georgie grew up — we can regret that much — and became a great Chemist (The world regrets that). He would 
have been greater, but his knife couldn't distinguish sodium from cream cheese. 

Chester was supposed to be a chemist, too. He became a renowned scientist early in life, but had hard luck: 
he got married, and his wife made him go to work. Despite this handicap, however, Chester rocked in Fame until 
he tried some of Georgie's synthetic sausage for supper — now Chester rocks in Glory. 

Nobody is acquainted with the place or way that Josey arrived in this world, except a very reputable person 
who claims that the famed scientist fell, full grown, from a box car that was passing across Broad along Sixth St. The 
same reputable person exhibits, as proof, a dent in the sidewalk on the North corner of Broad at Sixth, where, 
deponent says further, Josey's head struck when the box car deposited its unwanted philosopher, josey became a 
master of Physics, but he died of remorse before his work was done. He failed a student for not turning in a 
complete set of laboratory papers, and Josey's tender heart gave way under the grinding of his conscience 

Now all three of the wise scientists reside in the land of platinum crucibles and forceps: Georgie makes a 
tooth paste that would take the paint off a battle ship; Chester blows a left wing off of Paradise everv week or two- 
and Joey beats tuning forks and sends radio until the angels request him to either stop or take a transfer. And 
they all are happy in the home where good scientists go. 

Niay eacepay aymay heytay esideray. (Pig Latin for "In peace may they reside." 

I placed my knife and fork down, lit a cigarette, and glanced over the faces at the table. I seemed to remem- 
ber seeing some of them before. A Mr. Eubanks on my right was telling his war experiences to a friend. The friend 
appeared bored, but listened on without interrupting. At the far end of the table sat one Mr. Hardy, who had a 
face capable of turning a rosy red every time someone cracked a joke. 

I sat back uneasily and listened. Some Mr. Cordle whispered to a Mr. Etheredge. Etheredge. in turn, 
retorted with a loud voice that everyone could hear: 

"But, Cordle, every tub sits on its own bottom." 
My mind suddenly flashed with unpleasant memories as the last utterance fell upon my ears and wedged itself 
into other incidents of the evening; so in order to relieve myself of these uncherished thoughts. I got up and 
walked with haste from the room. 



DEDICATED TO OUR ENGLISH TEACHERS 

"We'll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes; 

But the plural of ox should be oxen, not oxes. 

Then one fowl is goose and two are called geese. 

Yet the plural of moose should never be meese. 

You may find a lone mouse or a whole lot of mice; 

But the plural of house is houses, not hice. 

If the plural of man is always called men, 

Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen? 

The cow in the plural may be cows or kine; 

But the plural of vow is vows, not vine. 

If I speak of a foot and you show me your feet. 

And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet? 

If one is a tooth and a whole set is teeth. 

Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth? 

If the singular is this and the plural is these, 

Should the plural of kiss be nick-named keese? 

Then one may be that, and three would be those; 

Yet hat in the plural would never be hose; 

And the plural of rat is rats, not rose. 

We speak of a brother and also of brethren; 

But though we say mother, we never say methren. 

The masculine pronouns are he, his, and him; 

But imagine the feminine she, shis, and shim. 

So the English, I think you will all agree. 

Is the most wonderful language you ever did see." 



PRAYER TO ANY TEACHER: 

Oft' in the even'tide when my work is done. 
And all your principles have proved but one. 

My book I lay upon the mantle small 
And journey thence by foot into the hall. 

My weary legs from there carry me to bed 
And as upon the pillow soft I lay my head, 

1 say a silent prayer for thy bread and keep 
And for the students yet to fail and weep. 

Ah! But wast so kind to see and feel 

And pray and hope and kneel 

For mine sake. 

That in mine hour of deliverance 

I would not show indifferance 

And lose the "cake." 



-By Jehemiah Alexander McDonald 




50PHOMORE5 






OFFICERS CF SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Dorroh Lee Nowell, Jr. 

Lieutenant 1; Hi-Y 1; Sabre Club 1; 
Football Letter 1; Intramural Basketball 
1; Intramural Baseball 1; Intramural 
Volley Ball 1; Captain 2; Major 2; 
President, Sophomore Class 2; President, 
Student Council 2; President, Sabre 
Club 2; Treasurer Hi-Y 2; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 2; Assistant Coach "B" Varsity; 
Tennis Tournament 2. 



Dick Daniel 

Major 1; Colonel 2; Hi-Y 2; Sabre 
Club 1, 2-; Golf Team 1, 2; Secretary 
of Sophomore Class; Military Editor of 
Musketeer; Business Manager of An- 
nua 1 . 



Henry W. Harbin 

Rho Chi 1; President, Rho Chi 2; 
Vice-President of Student Council 1; 
Student Council 2; Chemistry Club 2 
(President); Vice-President Letter Club; 
Gold "R" Society. 




John C. Bell 

President, Freshman Class; Member 
Student Council 1; Company Rifle Team 
1; Gold "R" Society; Captain 1; Major 
2; President, Junior College Hi-Y 2; 
Vice-President' Sophomore Class; Editor- 
in-Chief of Rainbow 2; Rifle Team 1 and 
2; Secretary of Officers Club 1 and 2; 
Basketball 1 and 2; Varsity Club. 



William Randolph Dunbar 

Major 1; Company Football 1; Inter- 
class Basketball 1 (Lunch Room. 1 ; Stu- 
dent Council 1; Company Rifle Team 1; 
Inter-class Baseball 1 (Hi-Y); Inter-class 
Volley Ball 1 (Hi-Y); Hi-Y 1 and 2; 
Gold "R" Society; Lieutenant-Colonel 2 
Rifle Team 1, 2; Varsity Basketball 2; 
Treasurer of Sophomore Class; Law 
Club 2; Officers Club 1, 2; Circulation 
Manager of Annual Staff. 



Luther Hankinson Stafford 

Captain 1; Golf Team 1; Captain, 
Golf Team 2; Cheer Leader 1, 2; Liter- 
ary Society 1,2; Hi-Y 1, 2; Sabre Club 
1,2; Student Council 2; Business Man- 
ager of Annual 2; Volley Ball (Hi-Y 
Team); Spanish Club; Varsity Club; 
Intramural baseball 2; Pre-Law Club 
Treasurer. 



THE AINBOW 1935 



trieda Banks 









Charles Gordon Beard 



William Butler Blandenburg 
First Lieutenant 2; Officers Club 2. 



Elizabeth Bostick 

Hi-Y-W I j Basketball 1, 2; Glee Club 
1,2; Literary Society 2; Sports Editor of 
Annual Staff 2; Sports Editor of Mus- 
keteer 2; Varsity Club Sec.-Treas. 2. 




Helen Barnard 
Glee Club 1; Hi-Y-W 1. 



John Robinson Bell 
Glee Club 1 and 2. 



Anna Boeckman 

High Honor 1; Literary Society 1; 
Vice-President, Literary Society 2; Glee 
Club 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 



Richard Campbell Bryson 

Major 1; Football 1; Treasurer of 
Sabre Club 1; Secretary Hi-Y 2; Presi- 
dent Hi-Y 2; Lieutenant-Colonel 2; Letter 
Club 2; Picture Editor of Annual Staff. 



Phoebe Cheek 

Literary Society 1, 2; Embryonic 
Pedagogues 2. 



Grady Cannon Corley 

Basket Ball 1, 2; Inter-class Basketball 
1; Inter-Class Volley Ball 2 (Hi-Y); 
Member Hi-Y 2. 



Helen Dennis 



Grace Dye 

Literary Society 1; High Honor 1; 
Teachers Club 2; Embryonic Peda- 
gogues 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 




Augustus Harrison Corley, Jr.. 

Football 1; Inter-class Basketball 
team 1 (Lunch Room); Inter-class Base- 
ball team 1 (Lunch Room); Hi-Y 2; 
J. C. A. Basketball team 2; Letter Club 
2. 



Charles Sibley Daley 

Football 1 (Varsity); Basketball 1 
(Varsity); Captain of the Staff 1; Cap- 
tain Regimental Adjutant 1; Major 2; 
Officers Club 1, 2; President Law Club 
2; Hi-Y 2; Literary Law Club. 



John Doyle 

Dramatic Club 1; Literary Society 1. 
2; Glee Club 2; Secretary of Cervantes 
Club 2. 



Jewelene Epps 
Glee Club 1, 2; Spanish Club 2. 



Jane Eve Fair 



Hi-Y-W. 



George Little Fuller 

Captain of Band I; 2nd Place in 
Battey Memorial Contest 1; 2nd Place 
Rifle Team 1; Director of School Or- 
chestra 1; Glee Club 1; Literary So- 
ciety 1; Officers Club 1, 2; Captain on 
the Staff 2; Captain of Rifle Team 2; 
Law Club; Member Gold "R" Club; 



Judith Clark Gracey 

Literary Society 1; High Honor 1; 
Activity Editor of Annual 2; Phi Theta 
Kappa. 










| 




Louise Fournace 

Glee Club 1; Literary Society 1; 
Honor 1; Orchestra 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; 
Varsity Club. 



Hannah Gillman 

Embioynic Pedagogues 2; 
Society 1, 2; Honor 1. 



Literary 



Annette Gercke 
Hi-Y-W 1. 



Wistar Laun Graham 
Chemistry Club. 





Richard Franklin Halford 

Literary Society 1, 2; Rho Chi 2; 
Chemistry Club 2; Glee Club 2, Rho 
Chi Volley Ball 2. 



Charles Pickett Hardy 

Captain 1, 2; Hi-Y 2; Dramatic Club 
1; Inter-class Basketball 1 (Lunch Room); 
Vice-President Law Club 2; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 2; Literary Society 2; Sabre 
Club 1, 2; Volley Ball 2. 



Sara Harrell 



Hi-Y-W 1. 



Wynona Harrison 

Honor 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Literary 
Society 1, 2; Embryonic Pedagogues 2. 



{Catherine Sumerau Holley 

High Honor 1; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Y. W. C. A. Club 2. 





James Walker Harper 

Secretary of Chemistry Club 2; Lit- 
erary Society 2; Volley Ball 2 (Demons)! 
Art Editor of Annual Staff. 



Ruth Hardeman Harris 

High Honor 1; Literary Society 1, 2; 
Y. W. C. A. 2. 



Mary Holland 

Literary Society 1; Embryonic Peda- 
gogues 2; Y. W. C. A. Club 2. 



Emile Hummel 

Hi-Y 1, 2; Rho Chi 1. 2; Golf Team 
1, 2; Football 2; Basketball 2 (Hi-Y); 
Volley Ball 2; Cheer Leader 2. 






Glenn Ivey 

Highest Honor 1; Literary Society 1; 
Treasurer of Freshman Class; Embryonic 
Pedagogues 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 



Julia Elizabeth Jackson 

Literary Society 1, 2; Honor Roll 1, 
2; Phi Theta Kappa. 



Margaret Jernigan 

Winner of Mixed Doubles Tennis 
Tournament 1; Cheer Leader 2; Chem- 
istry Club 2; Treasurer of Chemistry 
Club 2. 



Eleanor Johnson 

Honor 1; Glee Club 1; Embryonic 
Pedagogues 2 (Vice-President). 














' 






^K 




Wyke Cleveland Ivey 

1st. Lieutenant Band 1, 2; School Or- 
chestra 1, 2; Officers Club 1, 2; Glee 
Club 2; Hi-Y 2; Captain 2. 



Miriam James 

Literary Society 1; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Embryonic Pedagogues 2. 



Frances Joe 

High Honor 1; Literary Society 1, 2; 
Glee Club 2; Y. W. C. A. Club 2; Phi 
Theta Kappa. 



William Joplin 

Varsity Football 1; Class Basketball 
1; Law Club 2. 



Dorothy Christine Kelly 
Chemistry Club; "Y" Club. 




^ .■""> 



Mary Frances Kennedy 
Honor 1; President Literary Society 2. 



Doris Levkoff 
Glee Club 1, 2; Literary Society 1, 2. 



Mary Daniel Meurer 
Honor 1; Spanish Club 2. 



Joel Bernard Marks 














I 





Mary Linson 

Glee Club 1' 2; Literary Society 2; 
Secretary and Treasurer of Embryonic 
Pedagogues Club 2. 



Elna Lombard 

Hi-Y-W 1; Literary Society 1; Basket- 
ball 1, 2; Varsity Club 2. 



Arthur Allen Maryott . 

Honor 1; J. C. A. Tennis Team 1; 
Tennis Tournament 1; Winner of Boys 
Doubles in A. R. C. and J. C. A.,- Gold 
"R" Society; Captain of "Demons" Vol- 
ley Ball team 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 









Elizafeth Mayo 



Rogers McAuliffe 



Helen Elizabeth Ouzts 

High Honor 1; Literary Society 2; 
Glee Club 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 



Edmund Allen Pendleton, Jr. 

Captain 1, 2; Joke Editor of Annual 
Staff 2. 








*»£. I *• 






Mary Mulcay 



Marion Hampon McLin 
Chemistry Club. 



Margie Pardue 
Embryonic Pedagogues 2. 



Paul B. Pritchard, Jr. 

Rho Chi 1. 2; Literary Society 1, 2; 
Chemistry Club 2; Glee Club 2; Treas.. 
Rho Chi. 



Angelo Joseph Punaro 
Literary Society 1, 2; Spanish Club 



Vivian Quarles 

Glee Club 1, 2; Honor 1; Literary 
Society 2. 



Richard Arthur Russell 

First Lieutenant 1; Sabre Club, 1, 2; 
Rho Chi 2; Captain 2. 



W. A. Steed 










Itala Punaro 
Literary Society 1, 2; Glee Club 1- 2. 



Albert Julius Roesel 
Football 1. 



E. Studley Smith 
Volley Ball 2 (Demons). 



Dorothea Steffan 



Glee Club 1 . 



Emily Hains Stelling 

Honor 1; Literary Society 1, 2; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 



Betty Trimble 

High Honor 1; Glee Club 2; Literary 
Society 2; Annual Staff 2; Phi Theta 
Kappa 



Mary Willis 

Secretary Freshman Class; Literary 
Society 1, 2; Literary Editor of Annual 1. 



Read W. Wynn 
Hi-Y Club 1, 2. 




Virginia Louise Stephens 

High Honor 1; Literary Society !, 2; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 



Martha Wilder 

Honor 1; Dramatic Club 1; Y. W. C. 
A 2; President Embryonic Pedagogues. 



Virginia Worsham 

Honor 1; Glee Club 1, 2; President 
Cervantes Club 2; Embryonic Peda- 
gogues 2. 



Charles Pitthauser 

Letter in Sewing 1; Captain of Hockey 
Team 3; Hindu Club 3; Winner of 
Booby Prize 4; Pressing Club 7; Winner 
of Soap Bubble Contest 8; Right Real 
Admiral of Punishment class 6. 









Beverly Wray Hook 
Spanish Club. 




Hamby Mize 

Football 1; Rho Chi 1, 2; Secretary, 
Rho Chi 2; Chemistry Club 2; Glee Club 
2; Literary Society 1. 



Class Poem 



Again Class Day has rolled around, 

Our year is nearly done. 
We have had our ups and downs. 

Also our share of fun. 

The town clock gave' us trouble, 

Striking nine so much too soon; 

And our trouble would be double. 

When we missed our lunch at noon. 

But we have buckled down to business, 
And have tried to do our part, 

Each boy has kept his counsel. 
Each girl has kept her heart. 

Save one I failed to mention, 
Who had trouble to decide, 

But let us hope she chose the right, 
For she's now a fair young bride. 

Some have lost much time in spooning. 
And oft have neglected books. 

But what boy could keep from mooning, 
With girls of such good looks? 

So our class now stands together, 
On the threshold of new life, 

Hoping all for balm}- weather, 

But not fearing storm or strife. 

So let us trust the coming years, 

Our class for the right will stand, 

Each girl wearing the womanly crown. 
Each boy becoming a man. 



-Libbo Bostick. 



THE RAINBOW 1935 



Class Prophecy — Reunion 1946 



Augusta, Georgia- 
June 1, 1946. 



Now Jane Eve dear, 



I sadly fear 
A good' time you have missed. 
The old crowd met and talked and kissed, 
But missed you just the same. 
If you could see how many came 
I"m sure you would confess, 
That our reunion was indeed 
A great and grand success. 
Not all could come, it was quite sad. 
But those who did were very glad 
To pass the news of all they knew 
So we have learned of quite a few 
Who in the class seemed marked for fame, 
But let us call them each by name. 

Anna Boeckman's thesis on straight fish hooks 

Is now being printed in high-brow books. 

She used to help us "flunkers" out 

And now's an authority on catching trout. 

Graham the chemist has reached the top 

He has invented a kind of bottled pop. 

Mary Willis has opened a school 

To teach the girls the golden rule. 

How they all may get their man 

And then may keep him if they can. 

Sarah Harrell, after thought profound, 

Runs an agency for the lost and found. 

Oh, here's some news I hate to tell, 

The sad- sad story of John R. Bell. 

He started out on a world wide cruise 

And from him there has been no news. 

Charlie Daley has trained some frogs 

To help him out in calling hogs. 

Judith Gracey, although thrice wed, 

Has not a gray hair in her head. 

Augusta for Jernigan was much too slow, 

When once she started she kept on the go. 

Paris is now where she has her shack, 

And it was too far for her to come back. 

The Corley brothers still look the same, 

Though in vaudeville they have charged their name. 

George Fuller runs a pop gun stand, 

And is the big-shot of the land. 

Martha Wilder's acting was so good, 

She couldn't be spared from Hollywood. 

Hummel is supposed to be raising rice, 

But makes his money by shooting dice. 

Dorroh Nowell has studied in foreign parts, 

And knows the ins and outs of hearts. 

Read Wynn, I know, you'd never guess 

Is teaching history at T. H. S. 

Betty Trimble, my dear, now don't say it out loud, 

Of her big family is very proud. 

Arthur Maryott has invented a wonderful hook 

That while playing tennis will hold his book. 

Hamby Mize is now a dancing teacher, 

He likes it better than being a Dreacher. 



Did you hear about Hannah Gillman, my dear, 
While touring Europe she married a peer. 
And now lives in a castle grand, 
The Lady of all the near-by land. 

Now "Libbo" Bostick is a perfect dream 
Since she's been using freckle cream. 

Dick Daniels and wife are going to part, 
Since it's only Golf that fills his heart. 

Charles Hardy has invented an evening dress skirt, 
That can drag the floor and catch no dirt. 

Henry Harbin is teaching a German class 
Where you need not study, but still can pass. 

John C. Bell has deserted his books, 

And is seen in the company of high class crooks. 

Elna Lombard has many joys. 

The chief of these is her camp for boys. 

Billy Dunbar, fine and fat, 
Told me news of this and that; 
He says that he is planting land, 
Making things grow in plain old sand. 

And then at the end of one long day 
We heard the famous Punaro play. 
On radio known near and far, 
Itala is now a very great star. 

Dick Halford, now this is news, 
Has invented a use for all old shoes. 

Emily and Virginia, for several years, 
Have had a business canning pears. 
Their brand is called the "Double S," 
For Stelling and Stephens you could guess. 

Vivian Quarles is raising flowers, 

She works in her garden for hours and hours. 

She crossed a rose with a garden pea, 

And the result is wonderful to see. 

Jewelene Epps is running around 

With the richesi bachelor of the town. 

It is said that they will soon be wed, 

When he gets enough money to buy her bread. 

Virgnia Worsham paused to say, 

That she is writing a problem play. 

Of the problem she was not quite clear, 

But of success she had no fear. 

The Joes in business have done very well, 

Frances can figure and William can sell. 

Helen Barnard, full of fun, 

Keeps her husband on the run. 

Walker Harper, always smart, 

Has done big things with his art. 

Dot Kelly, wore a thoughtful look, 

She was planning to write a chemistry book. 

Some of the boys were far away, 

These had jobs with the N. R. A. 

The rest of the class, reunions spurning, 

Were busy keeping home fires burning. 

You can. believe as much of this as you choose, 

Yours for bigger and better news. 

— Annette Gercke. 




FRESHMEN 












C^o ^Che Afresh 



imrn 



Realizing the importance of the 
Freshman Class to be greater than that 
shown to it in the past, the staff this 
year gives to you the prominence de- 
served by a group that has shown it- 
self to be so ready to contribute to 
the success of our yearbook. 






OFFICERS OF FRESHMAN CLASS 



James G. Bail::: 

Hi-Yr Student Council; President, 
Freshman Class; Basketball. 



(Catherine Samille Saye 
Literary Society; Girls "Y" Club. 



David S. Daley, Jr. 

Captain; Assist. Coach "B" Varsity 
Varsity Club; President, Varsity Club 
Basketball; Captain, Basketball Team 
Junior College Hi-Y; Gold "R"; Student 
Council; Officers Club; Major. 




Margaret Hollingsworth 
Girls "Y" Club. 



Elizabeth Skinner 

Treasurer of Freshman Class; Literary 
Society. 






A. Dean Nowell 

Hi-Y-W 1; Cheer Leader 1, 2; Feature 
Section 2; Musketeer Staff 2; Secretary, 
Student Council 2; Student Council 2; 
Varsity Club. 









Dorothy Adams 



Cleo F. Bacon 



Frances F. Bailey 
Literary Society; Glee Club. 



Susan Barnes 

Chemistry Club; Girls "Y" Club 
(Hi-Y-W); Glee Club. 



Mary Alice Berckmans 



Gladys Bcdeker 
Alembic Chemistry Club. 




John Lloyd Adams 
Law Club; 2nd Lieutenant. 



Charles Bailey 
Rho Chi; Chemistry Club. 



Joe Baird 

Chemistry Club; Literary Society; 
Rho Chi. 



Robert Barton 

Rho Chi Club; First Lieutenant 
Band; Orchestra. 



Helen Blum 
Alembic Chemistry Club. 



Alma June Boozer 
Spanish Club. 



THE RAINBOW 335 



Sara Frances Boyd 



L. A. Bryant, Jr. 
Second Lieutenant; Rifle Team. 



Kathleen Lucille Byers 
School Orchestra 1 . 



Harold B. Chandler 

First Lieutenant Band; Rifle Team; 
Chemistry Club; Pre-Law Club; Officers 
Club; School Orchestra; Company Foot- 
ball "E" Company. 











Dorothy Bracey 

Literary Society; Junior College Y. 
W. C. A. Club; Alembic Chemistry Club. 



Eugene Hampton Bryson 

Gold "R" Society; Varsity Club; Rho 
Chi Club; Basketball Team. 



Victor Casella 



Charlie C Coleman 

Captain Adjutant; Sabre Club; J. C. 
Hi-Y; Gold "R" Society. 



A. H. Cooper 

Literary Society 2' 3, 4. Track '33; 
Hi-Y 2, Treasurer 3, Vice-President 4; 
Glee Club 4; Managing Editor of Mus- 
keteer 4; Corporal 3; Vice-President 
Feb. Class '35; Brevet 2nd Lieutenant 4; 
Company Football 3. 



Frances Curry 
Chemistry Club; Spanish Club. 



■ - 



j 





Ruth Cowan 
Literary Society; Cervantes Club. 



Marion Nesbit Dasher 

Circulation Manager Musketeer; Offi- 
cers Club; Captain Band; School 
Orchestra; Glee Club. 









Margaret Elizabeth Dula 



Charles G. Farp. 
Literary Society; Glee Club. 



Leonard Garten 
Chemistry Club. 



Elaine Goodson 
Exchange Editor of Musketeer. 



Thelma Harbin 

Literary Society; Girls Y. W. C. A 
Club. 



Edna Harrell 

Winner of Stunt Night; Junior Col- 
lege Basketball Team; Literary Society. 




Annie Maude Edmunds 
Literary Society. 



William B. Forney 
Battalion Adjutant; Glee Club 2. 



Mary Givens 

Alembic Chemistry Club; Literary 
Society; J. C. A. Y. W. C. A. Club. 



Edith Halford 
Glee Club; Girls Y. W. C. A. Club. 



Frances Waddelle Hardy 
Literary Society. 



William Heffernan 



Martha Herman 
Cheer Leader; Girls' Basketball team. 



Beverly Hook 
Write-up found in Sophomore Class. 



Myrtle Howard 
Literary Society. 



James A. Hungerpillar 

Literary Society; Law Club; Company 
Football. 



Llewellyn R. Hutto 



Sara Elizabeth Kimbrell 
Glee Club. 




Jennye Ruth Hill 
Literary Society; Girls "Y" Club. 



James Otto Hoover 

Editor-in-Chief Musketeer; J. C. A. Lit- 
erary Society; Secretary, Literary So- 
ciety; Captain; Glee Club; Chemistry 
Club; Officers Club. 



Carl W. Howard 

President Law Club; Inter-Scholastic 
Basketball; Joseph Mullarky Oratorical 
Contest; Debating Team; Dramatic Club; 
Law Club; Captain R.O.T.C.; State 
Pres. Hi-Y; Treas. Officers Club; Vice- 
Pres. Literary Society; Battey Memorial 
Contest; Business Mgr. Musketeer; Of- 
ficers Club; Company Football. 



{Catherine Hall Hurst 



Literary Society; J. C. A. "Y" Club. 



Mattie Avice James 

Literary Society; Glee Club; Basket- 
ball Team (Girls). 



Donald Kirkpatrick 






Kathryn Kitchen 



Moody Elmo Layfield, Jr. 
First Lieutenant; Officers Club; Glee 



Club. 



Ralph Victor Levy 



L. Lun<3 



Hamby Mize 



Sara Morgan 



H-Y-W 1. 




William Kitchen 

First Lieutenant; Officers Club; Rho 
Chi; Rifle Team; Varsity Club. 



Eugenia Lee 
Literary Society; Glee Club 



Vivian Sinclare Logue 



Sara Milligan 



Marie Mize 
Junior College Y. W. C. A. 



Camilla Motes 



Margie Mulherin 
Alembic Chemistry Club. 



William Robert McLin 
Literary Society. 



Dorothy Newman 
Basketball. 



Norma Pirkle 

Literary Society; Glee Club; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Ralph Pritchard 
Literary Society; Rho Chi. 



Patrick Michael Redd 
First Lieutenant; Sabre Club. 




Lula Hall McCord 
Glee Club. 



Harry B. Neal 



Frank H. Pierce 

Head Cheer Leader; "Demons" Bas- 
ketball Team; Baseball Team; Law- 
Club; Manager, Junior College Golf 
Team. Varstiy Club. 



Mary Potter 



Donald H. Radford 

Rho Chi; Chemistry Club; Literary 
Society. 



Katherine Reese 









Eleanor H. Rucker 



Sara Norwood Sancken 



Pauline Scarboro 
Alembic Chemistry Club; Y. W. C. A. 



George Harold Seago 




Martha Sancken 



James Taylcr Sanders 
First Lieutenant Banc; Secretary, 
Alembic Chemistry Club; School Or- 
chestra; Assistant Business Manager 
i> 'usketeer. 



Fred Scott 
Pie-Law Club; Literary Society. 



Eleanor Belle Smith 



Thomas Z. Sprott 

F'irst Lieutenant; Alembic Chemistry 
Club. 



Bernice Stroupe 




Harry Eugene Steadman 
Rho Chi. 



William Francis Thompson 



Walter F. Timm, Jr. 
First Lieuterart; Scb.e Cub; Ca.:ia:n. 



Virginia Videtto 

Alembic Chemistry Club; Literary 
Society; Y. W. C. A. Club. 



James Martin Wallace 

Glee Club; First Lieutenant; Officers 
"ub; Law Club. 



Howard Raworth Walker 

Vice President of Alembic Chemistry 
Club. 



Myrtle Whitaker 

Literary Society; Alembic Chemistry 
Club; Cervantes Club. 



Winifred Woodward 
W. C. A. Cub. 




Franklin Augustus Toole 

President of Alembic Chemistry Club; 
Literary Society; Cervantes Spanish 
Club. 



Carolyn Louise Wallace 
Literary Society. 



Mary Helen Walker 
Literary Society; Basketball Team. 



Jennie Katherine Whitehead 



Margaret Jane Wiggins 

Assistant Business Manager of Mus- 
keteer. 



June Wright 



The Freshmen 

■ With Apologies to Longfellow) 



Up the steps to Junior College. 
L'p that broad and shining pathway. 
Came a hand of lowly Freshmen 
Half advancing, half retreating. 
Dark behind them lay in waiting 
Woes of all the unenlightened. 
Ignorance that is not blissful, 
F'ear and dread of such a living. 
Bright before them rose the portals, 
Rose the lofty, gleaming archway 
< )f the entrance into learning. 
( >f the door that leads to Knowledge. 
So they straightway entered in there. 
Full of courage and ambition. 
Confidence and hope and laughter. 
So was born this class of Freshmen. 
Many mysteries were shown them 
Ere thev trod the halls and staircases, 
Trod the length of Junior College — 
Mysteries of Course of Study, 
Fearful wonders of the Schedule. 
When at last these rites were finished, 
Then each small, expectant Freshman 
Learned to know, each one, his Home Room, 
Learned to find his way to Chapel — 
Grew with everything acquainted. 
From the Lunch Room to the Library- 
Soon advanced the football season. 
Then the Freshmen swarmed the bleachers. 
Cheered their comrades on to battle. 
Filled the air with lusty yelling. 
Everything they did with vigor,, 
Marched on drill field, sang in Glee Club. 
Went to meetings, went to dances. 
Thus they filled their days together. 
Man)- things the teachers taught them 
From their wondrous stores of wisdom, 
Facts of history, language, science, 
Pat'ently, with skill they taught them. 
'Til the heads of all these Freshmen 
Whirled with such increasing knowledge. 
Dates of battles, sides of angles. 
Laws of physics, composition. 
Formulae, French Conjugation 
All of these they strove to master. 
Then confronted by Exam Days 
Valiantly the)' went to battle. 
Wrestled with each knotty problem, 
Struggled 'til at last the)' conquered. 
Now the year is nearly finished, 
Year of work and fun andl friendship. 
But each Freshman has a vision 
( )f himself in robes majestic 
As a Sophomore. Lofty station. 
Sophomore of the Junior College! 

— Elizabeth Skinner. 



From the Senior Class to Richmond 

By I. W. Peters 

It lifts its massive cloud-bound head, 
Above the earth's sweet flower'd bed, 

And gazes out in space afar. 
May nothing- e'er its beauty mar. 

Its spirit stands for all that's good, 
Freedom fair, and brotherhood. 

Its halls hold laughing', serious throngs. 
Learning the best, and right from wrong 

It stands for God, as it should be; 
It teaches Mis way to you and me. 

We'll fight for it, as man to man; 
Forever may our Richmond stand. 

When Life's hard, bleak game is o'er. 
May mem'ries lead us to that door; 

And I 'ride our weakening hearts expand, 
As we embark from child to man. 

—I. W. PETERS 






SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS A. R. C. 



BOBBY MILLS President 

CHARLES THOMPSON . Vice-President 
GEORGE RHODES . . . Secretary 



ALEX DOREMUS 
ELLIOTT MORAN 
W. O. WHITE 



. Treasurer 
Council 
. Council 




Bobby Mills 

Football 2, 3, 4— Letter 3, 4; 
Company football 2; Hi-Y 3, 
4; Vice-President 3; Vice- 
President Student Council 4; 
Lieutenant 4; President Senior 
Class; Gold "R" 4; Musketeer 
Staff 4. 



Charles B. Thompson, Jr. 

Literary Society 1, 2, 3; 
Honor 1; Company football 2, 
3; Lieutenant 4; Football 
Letter 4; Glee Club 3; "Roys- 
ton's Ramblers" 3; Varsity 
Club 4; Sabre Cub 4; Rich- 
mond Hi-Y 3, 4; President A; 
Vice-President, Senior Class. 



George Thomas Rhodes 

Honor 1, 3; High Honor 2; 
Football 4; Class Officer 4; 
Glee Club 4; School Orches- 
tra 4; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Spanish 
Club 4; Sergeant 3; Lieuten- 
ant 4; Sabre Club 4. 



Charles Alexander Doremus 

High Honor 1; Highest Hon- 
or 2, 3; Sergeant 3; First 
Lieutenant 4; Literary Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-Piesident 3; 
Secretary 3; President 4; 
Business Manager, Musketeer 
3; Editor-in-Chief Annual 4; 
Treas., Senior Class; Student 
Council 3; Richmond Hi-Y 2, 



3, 4, Vice-President 2, 4, 
Scribe 3, President 4; Chemis- 
try Club 2; Sabre Club 4; 
Gold "R" 4; Valedictorian of 
1935; Representative of school 
in U. D. C. contest 2, 3; 
Elected "Best All-Round Sen- 



Robt. Edward Elliott Moran 

Literary Socety 1, 3, 4; 
Company football 1, 2; Foot- 
ball 3, 4, Letter 3; Coach "E" 
Company Football 4; Corporal 
1, Sergeant 2, Lieutenant 3, 
Captain 4; Sabre Club 3, 4; 
Student Council 4; Alternate 
Rifle Team 4. 



William Otis White 

Freshman Literary Society; 
Honor 1; Academy Literary 
Society 2, 3, 4, President 3; 
Rifle Team 2, 3,4, Medal 3, 4; 
Track Team 2, 3, 4, Letter 3, 
4; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Football Team 
3; Gold "R" 3; Student Coun- 
cil 4; Lieutenant 4; Annual 
Staff 4. 







ADAMS 
ALDRIDGE 
ANDERSON 
ANDERSON 



ANTONOKAS 
BALDOWSKI 
BARINOWSKI 
BARNARD 



David Landrum Adams, Jb. 

Corporal 2; Sergeant 3; 
Lieutenant 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Carlton Aldridge 



H. H. Anderson 



Rufus Oliver Anderson 
Sergeant 4. 



Chris Gus Antonokas 

Honor 1; Basketball 3; 
Spanish Club 4; Literary So- 
ciety 4. 



Cliff Herman Baldowski Walter T. Barinowski 

2nd Lieutenant in R.O.T.C. Corporal 2; Honor 2, 3. 
1; Letter in Football 4; Com- 
pany Football 2, 3, 4; Rifle 
Team 2. 



B. F. Barnard 

Literary Society 2; Glee 
Club 3; Sergeant 4. 






BARNES 



BILLS 



ELAND 



BLANDENBURG 



CARSWELL 
CHISOLM 
CLARK 
CLARY 




Linton Andrew Barnes 

Corporal 1; Sergeant 2; 
First Sergeant 3; Lieutenant 4. 



C. E. Bills 
Football 4; Sergeant 3, 4. 



Warren Reynolds Bland 
Brevet Second Lieutenant. 



Claudius HQ§er"--Blandenburg 
Company Football "B." 



James J. Carswell, Jr. 

Corporal 1; Football 2, 3 ,4, 
Letter 2, 4; Literary Society 
2, 4; Varsity Club 4. 



Leland DeLoac.i C:-iisolm 

Corporal 2; Guide Sergeant 
3; First Sergeant 4; Candi- 
date for Track 4. 



Verdery Austin Clark 

Literary Society 1, 2; Glee 
Club 2, 3, 4; Corporal 1; Ser- 
geant 3; Vice-President Span- 
ish Club 4; Basketball 3; 
Football 3. 



Thomas Louis Clary 

Literay Society 2; High 
Honor 1; Honor 2, 3; Cor- 
pora! 3; Sergeant 4; Brevet 
Second Lieutenant 4. 







CORR 

COURTNEY 
COVAR 
DALEY 



DAVENPORT 
DEAS 
DE WITT 
ELIXSON 



James Elmo Corr 

Sergeant 4; Honor 3; High 
Honor ] , 2; Brevet Second 
Lieutenant 4. 



Cal Courtney 

Officers' Club, Musketeer 
Staff; Basketball 3, 4; Track 
3, 4; Football 4; Captain 3, 4; 
Gold "R" 4; Glee Club 4; 
Varsity Club 4; Rifle Team 4. 



A. F. Covar 



Robert Daley 



Jouett Davenport, Jr. 



Frank David Deas, Jr. 

Honor 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2; 
Corporal 2, 3; First Sergeant 
4; Literary Society 1; Track 4; 
Brevet Second Lieutenant 4. 



Eugene Joseph DeWitt, Jr. 



James B. Elixson 

Richmond Hi-Y 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary 3; Honor 3; Annual 
Staff 4; Corporal 3; Brevet 
Second Lieutenant. 



EVANS 

FAUGHNAN 
FOLSOM 
FORBES 



FORTUNE. C. 
FORTUNE, . 
FULLER, W. 
FULGHUM 




William Henderson Evans 

High Honor 2; Sergeant 
3; Lieutenant 4. 



Edward Doris Faughnan 
Literary Society 4; Corporal 



Alva Spencer Folsom 
Sergeant 4. 



George Forbes 



Charles Kilpatrick Fortune 

Honor 1, 3; Corporal 3; 
Sergeant 4; Spansh Club 4; 
Candidate for Football 4; Can- 
date for Track 4; Tennis Team 
4. 



Jack Cranston Fortune 

Honor 1, 2, 3; Sergeant 3; 
Lieutenant 4; Spanish Club 4; 
Rifle Team 4; Football 4; Sa- 
bre Club 4. 



W. O. Fuller 



Kasper Fulghum 

Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Sergeant 
2, 3; 1st Lieutenant 4; Foot- 
ball 2, 3, 4, Letter 3, 4; Com- 
pary Football 2; Varsity 
Club 4; Swimming Team 4. 













GAVALAS 
GILLION 
GLICKERT 
GOLDSTEIN 



GRACEY 
GRIFFIN 
GRIZZEL 
HALL 



T. GAVALAS 



Stevens Irvin Gillion 
Corporal 1, 3; "B" Varsity 



R. Glickebt 



Meyer Goldstein 
Literary Society 1, 3. 



Robert Gracey 

Literary Society 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 2; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary 2, 3; Corporal 2, Ser- 
geant 3, Captain 4; Debating 
Team 2; Alternate Declamer 
3; Glee Club 3; Annual Staff 
4. 



F. E. Griffin 



Roy A. C. Gbizzel 

Literary Society 2; "B" Co. 
Rifle Team 4; Corporal 4. 



J. B. Hall 

Rifle Team 2, 3; Company 
Football "B" 4; Corporal 3, 4; 
Sergeant 4. 



HARDIN 
HARDY 
HARRIES 
HATCHER 



HEATH 
HEFFERNAN 
HENDERSON 
HUTSON 




William Walton Hardin 

Honor 2; Freshman Literary 
Society. 



Ed Hatcher 
Corporal 3; Sergeant 4. 



Harold B. Henderson 

Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Sergeant 2, 
Lieutenant 4. 



George Hardy 
Brevet 2nd Lieutenant 4. 



Jerome Lawrence Heath 



Alfred Stanley Harries 

Football Letter 2, 3, 4; 
Manager Basketball Team 4. 



Thomas Joseph Heffernan 

Literary Society 1, 4; Com- 
pany Football 2; Sergeant 3, 
4; 2nd Lieutenant 4; Officers' 
Club 4; Honor 1, High Honor 
2; Richmond Hi-Y 4. 



William Marks Hutson 

High Honor 1, 2; Staff Ser- 
geant 3; Academy Hi-Y 3, 4; 
1st Sergeant 4; Lieutenant 4; 
Rifle Team 3, 4; Sabre Club 
4. 






' 








IVEY 

JEFFCOAT 
JENKINS 
JORDAN 



KALE 

KITCHENS 
KLEIN 
KOCH 



Charles Ivey 
Lieutenant 3; Sabre Club 3. 



Harry Jeffcoat, Jr. 

Honor 1, 2, 3; Sergeant 3; 
1st Lieutenant 4; Annual Sta.'f 
4; Musketeer Staff 4; Literary 
Society 4; Gold "R". 



Milford Charles Jenkins 



John Coleman Jordan 
Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 






William Kale 

Corporal 1, 2, Sergeant 3, 4; 
Football 4; Company Rifle 
Team 4. 



Earle Dewey Kitchens 

Literary Society 2, 4; Glee 
Cub 4; "B" Varsity 4; Hi-Y 
3, 4; Track 4: Musketeer Staff 



M. Klein 



Uuban Thomas Koch, III 

Entered from Sea Breeze 
High, Fla. Glee Club Operetta 
4; Track 4; Swimming Team 
4; Tennis 4; Literary Society 
4; "Stunt Night," Musketeer 
Staff 4; Top Sergeant; Brevet 
2nd Lieutenant; Secretary, 
Academy Hi-Y. 



KREWSON 

LAMBACK 
LONG 
LANIER 



LEh 

LEMON 



LEV "IS, E. 



LEWIS, J. 







John Walker Krewson 


Charles Lamback 


C. A. Lang 


James Fargo Lanier 


Sergeant 3; Lieutenant 4; 






Manager, Basketball 1934; 


Rifle Team 3, 4; Sabre Club 4. 






Manager, Track 1933; Varsity 
Club; "Royston's Ramblers"; 
Baseball Letter 1932. 


Lansing Burrows Lee, Jr 


Cecil Lemon 


J. E. Lewis 


Samuel Joseph Lewis 


Gold "R"; Literary Society 




Company Football 2, 3, 4; 


Literary Society 1, 4; Cor- 


1, 2; Academy Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; 




Track Taem 2, 3, 4; Sergeant 


poral 3. 


Sergecnt 3, Lieutenant 4; 




3, 4; "B" Varsity 4. 




Vice-President Junior Class; 








State U.D.C. Contest 2; Sec- 








retary Chemistry Club 2; Sa- 








bre Club 4; Annual Staff 4; 








High Honor 1, 3; Highest 








Honor 2. 










MADDOX, A. 
MADDOX, E. 
MARSHALL 
MOBLEY 



MORAN 
MORGAN 
MORRIS, A. 
MORRIS, S. 



Audley Joseph Maddox 
Brevet Second Lieutenant. 



Earl Samuel Maddox 

Spanish Club 4; Sergeant 4; 
Brevet 2nd. Lieutenant. 



George 



Marshall 



Literary Society 1, 2; Ser- 
geant 3, 4; Lieutenant 4; An- 
nual Staff 4; Honor 1, 3; Glee 
Club 2; Officers' Club 4- 
Academy Hi-Y. 



James Harry Mobley 

Honor 3; Freshman Literary 
Society; A. R. C. Lietrary So- 
ciety 2, 3, 4; Company Foot- 
ball 1 , 2; Football 3, 4; Track 
3; Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3; 
Lieutenant 4; Sabre Club 4; 
Cervantes Club 4; Coach 
Company "H" Football 4. 



E. Moran 



H. M. Mcrgan 



B. A. Morris 

1st. Lieutenant; Band; Lit- 
erary Society; Basketball 3, 
4; Sabre Club. 



Simeon Dawson Morris, Jr. 
Honor 3, High Honor 1, 2; 
Literary Society 1, 2; Ser- 
geant 3, First Sergeant 4; Bre- 
vet 2nd. Lieutenant. 






MOSS 
MURRAY 

Mcdonald 

McLARTY 



McILWAINE 
McKIE 
NEWMAN 
NICHOLS 




Gordon Thomas Moss 

Honor 2, 3; Glee Club 2; 
Literary Society 4; Corporal 2; 
Sergeant 3; Captain 4; Bas- 
ketball 3, 4; Football 2; Track 
A 



Fhancis Joseph Murray 

Corporal 2; Sergeant 3; 
Honor 2, 3; Lieutenant 4: Sa- 
bre Club 4. 



Jerry Alexander McDonald 

Debating Team 3, 4; Liter- 
ary Society 3, 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Staff Sergeant 3; 



Robert Alexander McLarty 
High Honor 2; Literary So- 
ciety 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3; 
Sergeant 3, 4; Candidate for 
Football 3; Declamation Cup 
2, 3; Debating Team 3, 4; 
Glee Club 2; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; 
Secretary 3; Representative in 
State Declamation Contest; 
Candidate in Robt. E. Lee Es- 
say Contest. 



James Spencer McIlwaine, Jr. 

Entered from Dunbarton, S. 
C. High School, 1932; Honor 
1, 3; Staff Sergeant 4; Brevet 
1st. Lieutenant 4. 



Albert B. McKie 
Sergeant 3; Lieutenant 4. 



Ralph S. Newman 
Honor 1; Corporal 4. 



John Hagerty Nichols 

Company Football; Lieuten- 
ant; Captain; Officers' Club. 













NORMAN 
ODOM 
OTTINGER 
PARDUE 



PEARRE 
PEMBER 
PITTS 

POLLARD 



Charles M. Norman 

Corporal 2, 3; Sergeant 4; 
Track 4; Brevet 2nd. Lieuten- 
ant 4; Wrens Varsity Track 
and Football. 



Jack Hartin Odom 



Julius Ottinger 
Literary Society 3: Sergeant 



John F. Pardue 

Literary Society 3, 4; Ser- 
geant 3; Brevet 2nd. Lieuten- 
ant 4; Track 4. 



Charles Ray Pearre 

Basketball Letter 3, 4; Track 
2, 3; Sergeant 4; Brevet 2nd. 
Lieutenant 4. 



Frederic Pratt Pember 

Literary Society 1, 2; Glee 

Club 1; Sergeant 4; Brevet 
2nd Lieutenant. 



Charles H. Pitts 

Company Football 1 , 2, 3, 4; 
Literary Society 1. 



Warren W. Pollard 



POPKIN 
PUNARO 
RADFORD 

ROUNTREE 



ROX 

SALLEY 
SAYE 

SCOGGINS 




Morton Herman Popkin 
Spanish Club. 



Angelo B. Punaro 



R. Radford 



Morgan Rountree 

Letter in Basketball 2; Let- 
ter in Football 3. 



John Aloysius Rox, Jr. 

Chemistry Club 3; Corporal 
4, 5. 



Ronald Salley 



Samuel Wilson Saye, Jr. 

Literary Society 2, 3; Band 
2, 3, 4; Lieutenant 4. 



R. Scoggins 
Brevet 2nd. Lieutenant. 










SHERMAN 
SKINNER 
SLATON 
SLAUGHTER 



STELLING 
TANENBAUM 
TAYLOR 
TEBOW 



Sherman, Tom 

Glee Club 2, 3; Varsity 
Football 4; Company Football 
1. 2, 3; Sergeant 2, 3, 4; Var- 
sity Baseball 1; Track Team 
4. 



Charles Allen Skinny 

High Honor !, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 4; 
Student Council 3; Literary So- 
ciety 2, 3; Corporal 2; Ser- 
geant 3; Lieutenant 4; Rifle 
Team 2, 3. 4; Annual Staff 4; 
A. R. C. Hi-Y 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
2, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Gold 
"R" 3; Sabre Club 4; Chemis- 
try Club 2. 



James E. Slaton 

Track Team 3; Corporal 3; 
Sergeant 4. 



Billy Slaughter 
Brevet 2nd. Lieutenant. 



Edward L. Stelling, Jr. 

Highest Honor 1; High Hon- 
or 2, 3, 4; Literary Society 3, 
4; Spanish Club '35; Annual 
Staff '35; Lieutenant '35. 



J. L. Tanenbaum 



C. F. Taylor 



James Edward Tebow, Jr. 

Honor 3; Company Football 
1, 2, 3; Football 4; Basket- 
ball 3; Literary Society 4; 
Spanish Club 4; Track 4. 



TILLER 



TROMMERHAUSER 



TURNER 



TYSON 



WALLER 



WATKINS 



WILHEIT 



WILSON 




Francis E. Tiller 
Letter in Football 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council 3, 4; Captain 
R.O.T.C. 4; Literary Society 1, 
2. 3. 



CHAS. J. TROMMERHAUSER 

Sergeant 3; Lieutenant 4; 
Captain 4. 



Robert Lander Turner, Jr. 



Samuel Eugene Tyson 

Academy Literary Society 
2, 3; Debating Team 2; En- 
trant in National U.D.C. Con- 
test 1, 2; Sergeant 2, Corporal 
1; Secretary of Academy Lit- 
erary Society 3. 



Samuel Carpenter Waller 



William Marx Wat.. ins 



Philip Arthur Wilheit 



Joseph Butler Wilson 



High Honor 1, 2, Highest 
Honor 3; Sergeant 3; Brevet 
Lieutenant 4; Golf Letter 3 
Business Mgr. "Rainbow" 4 
Business Mgr. "Musketeer" 4; 
Literary Society 1, 2, Treas. 3, 
Sec'y and President 4; Rich- 
mond Hi-Y 2, 3, Treasurer 4; 
Winner of D.A.R. $5.00 for 
highest grade in American 
History 3; Gold"R" 4; Varsity 
Club 4; Entrant in Sidney La- 
nier Contest; Entrant in R. £. 
Lee Contest. 



Literary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Corporal 1, 3, 4; Spanish Club 
4. 



Honor 1; Literary Society 1, 
4; Glee Club 3, Stage Man- 
ager 4; Football 2; Basketball 

4. 






Prophecy of Senior Class 

By Jeremiah Alexander McDonald 



Ccurty Home, Atlanta, Ga„ 
June 5. 195Q. 



To His Excellency, Charles Alexander Doremus: 

Governor of Georgia, 

Federal Penitentiary. Cell No. 2,678, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

Dear Aiex:- 

I went down toward Augusta last week just to see how all the old members of our class were getting along, since they 
took over the City. It's too bad that Pitts and Tiller ran everybody out of town with Pitt's V-8, but you know, Alex, life is filled 
with bad mistakes — (Incidents, not people). Even in spite of evrything that's happened, though, the little village still stands 
elegantly. Of course, it's hollow and deserted; yet when I think back ever the years, I marvel that it exists at all. If you can 
get two or three weeks' vacation this summer (warden permitting), it will pay you to run down and look the old place over. 

Sometimes, Alex, little incidents come into our lives and remind us of past experiences; yet if I live a thousand years — 
which I doubt, with the weather so chilly and the coughs I'm ha ving — I believe I never shall spend a week so eventful as the 
week I spent in Augusta. During my stay there, I was reminded a million tin - pecuHar characteristics that r.cr y o'. ur 

class had while in school. These characteristics, however, have enlarged to vast proportions. 

On driving into the city, I parked my car on the seven hundred block of Greene Street. The first thing I noticed as I 
walked down the boulevard was Theo Gavalas, lying in the sh ade of an evergreen tree, scoring away to high heaven, while 
the contents of his apple cart baked under the heat of the noon-day sun. I was tempted to awake the fellow, but better judgment 
changed my mind as I thought over the situation. 

Not knowing exactly where to begin sight-seeing, I rmved in the direction of the courthouse, where I arrived after a few 
minutes walk. 

I went up the steps and passed through the doer into the office section of the building. No one was there; so I con- 
cluded that court was going on. Tiptoeirg into the courtroom, I sat down among the spectators. 

Sam Waller was on the bench. He was staring out across empty space in an absent-minded fashion; and every now 
and then, as a fly or something interrupted his seance, he brought his gavel down on the desk with a mighty bang and charged 
the council that happened to be on the floor to limit his address to ten minutes, while all along, the innocent lawyer would only 
be questioning a witness. Not satisfied with his exhibition, his honor would rap upon the top of the desk vigorously and call 
for order in a loud voice, while the only noise to be heard was the soft snoozing of the jurymen. 

The prisoner, ferry McDonald, was being tried for witchcraft, because he predicted the future of our class with such 
deadly accuracy. 

Stamping up and down the floor as he pulled his hair in woe, was the prosecuting attorney, Robert McLarty. He soon 
got his points straight, however, and walked over to the jury box, where he stood, glaring succeedingly at each juror with a look 
of scorn. Suddenly, there burst from his lips a mighty peal: "Gentlemen," he bellowed, "I cannot address you in flowery words 
of oratory; but I can say as effectively as any man that this man is a scoundrel." H pointed an accusing finger at the prisoner. 
Raising his clenched fist above his head, he brought it down toward the jury box rail with a mighty force, at the same time pro- 
nouncing the word "scoundrel"; but, unfortunately, his fast-moving hand missed its destination and continued toward ihe floor 
where the disgruntled lawyer followed it until he lay sprawled cut upon the boards, minus three teeth, his good will, a straight 
nose, and his dignity. Picking himself up, he walked to his seat, grumbling something about the janitor leaving peas on the floor. 

There were three attorneys for the defense: Lee, White, and Tyson. They didn't seem to be very jubilant over praising 
their client; so naturally, the trial was very uninteresting. Tyson gave a long string of technical evidence totally irrelevant to 






the trial, while Lee and White amused themselves by using words that none of the jury could understand. 

The jury consisted of farmers, mechanics, nut-invert rrs. and has-been football players. They were as follows: Barnard, 
Brodeur, Carswell, Corr, Jack Fortune, Charles Fortune, Fulghum. Gracey, Hardy. Kale, Lewis — all of whom you know quite well. 
Alex. 

I hadn't noticed the clock on the wall, but apparently somebody else had; for as soon as the hour hand reached twelve 
o'clock, the judge set himself into an electric motion, and jumping over his desk, he rushed down the aisle, screaming "Lunch," 
at the same time strewing his legal robes behind, on the floor. The jurymen, counsel, prosecutor, spectator, and prisoner alike 
made a wild dash for the entrance, producing a mighty clamcr as they did so, and showing no respect whatsoever for rank or 
caste. With the exception of me and one other person, the courtroom was completely emptied in thirteen and one-half seconds 
flat. The other person was none other than "Manny" Klein. 

Looking aiound over the courtroom suspiciously, as if not wanting anyone to see him, and not noticing me, since I was 
sitting very low in my seat, he drew from his pocket three test tubes. He poured the contents of two into one and shook the 
single tube vigorously; then with an air of ecstasy, he turned the receptacle up to his lips and drained the gooey substance. 
Undoubtedly, years of confinement in a laboratory had got the best of pool old Klein; and there he was, pitiful creature, loose in 
the head and broken in intelligent status; for now, as it appeared, his chemicals were his food. 

Presently, I emerged from the courthouse, disgusted with the scenes I had so recently witnessed and walked around to 
the newspaper office. Not knowing what to expect, I walked in and up, innocently hoping to see some of, my old friends with 
the same characteristics they had possessed years before. How disappointed I "was to be! 

As I passed through the portal of the editing room, my ears were met by sharp metallic "clash" that issued from a type- 
writer in the corner every minute or two, and reverberated around the room like a mighty crash of thunder. Over the clacking 
machine leaned Alva Cooper, with his eyes fixed on the keyboard and his right hand raised far above his head, his index finger 
extended. I looked closer and beheld that he had a book open on his right called 'The Huntum and Pecke Typewriting 
System," by Urban Koch. At a desk in the middle of the room sat Willie Hutson, glaring down at a pile of manuscripts. I 
walked over to see if he would recognize me. but like all the rest of the old friends I had seen, he only glarde at me with blank 
eyes. I turned away — awed, broken; for even William had weakened under the strain of environmental degeneration. You can 
imagine the rest of my story. Had I the power, had I the power, had I the command of sympathy-drawing English, I would 
quickly portray the balance of our comrades; but as I think of them all: Krewson, Clark, Elixson, and the rest, words fail to picture 
and thoughts fail to resolve themselves on paper; yet, Alex, I must say a little more but only toward the termination of this, my 
sad narrative 

I left the newspaper office and walked outside. As I stepped through the doorway of the building on to the street, two 
policemen accosted me and told me that I was under arrest. For no reason whatsoever they did so, except, perhaps, because I 
was not a native of the city. These two men were Hardy and Glickert. I submitted to their demand and went ■with them to the 
police station, where the Chief, Allen Skinner, requested that I pay ten dollars and cost of refreshments for the entire force (this 
was $8.75) or else. 

I paid the money, left the police station as quickly as possible, and went with all haste to the place where I had parked 
my automobile; but my poor car, sorry to say, was about two blocks from where I had parked it, diligently wrapped around a 
telephone pole. Seeing that my vehicle was of no use to me, I started out on foot and arrived back in Atlanta yesterday after a 
seventy-hour walk. 

I trust, Alex, that you will have a better reception, if you go down this summer than I had last week. 

With best wishes, 

I remain, 

HM. 



Class History 






WHEN, in the course of human events, in September of the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
hirty, that we, a group of timid but aspirant freshmen knocked at the portals of the Richmond Academy., we were 
admitted. To our juvenile and inexperienced minds, tha . first year was one series of horrors. We were herded 
into the auditorium (which we afterwards found was called chapel), and told by a red-faced man with spectacles 
what to do and where to go until our mind was whirling with instructions. Then and there were our troubles started. 
We were told by towering giants — whom we later learned were designated by the ponderous term "faculty" — that we 
had had all play and no work in our respective grammar schools, but now we were going to buckle down, as it were, 
to hard labor, so to speak. 

After a few days of being buffetted about in the corridors as a barque on an angry sea, we were instructed 
to go out on the drill field where some more giants, however, less towering than the first, instructed us to form 
into two lines, one behind the other, as rows of corn. We were then taught squads right, squads left, squads east 
and squads west and all the other things that Colonel Goodwin, who was then the commandant, could find in a large, 
awe-inspiring, blue book called the R. O. T. C. manual. 

After a few weeks our qualms of fear and uncertainty gradually began to be dissipated and by degrees we 
became accustomed to the general order of things. 

Exams!!! How well will those first exams stand out in our memory! Each morning an excited group would 
cluster in a knot outside of Mr. Mitchell or Mr. Eubank's door tensely awaiting him to post the results of the 
examination. "Did you pass?", "How did you do?", they would eagerly ask each other. 

We are now sophomores possesed of a gigantic conceit over those miserable little freshmen. How silly they 
act! How could we have ever been like that! We turn up our noses! Faugh! What a disgrace to be seen talking 
to one of those wretched creatures. Yet upon sober reflection, each one of us secretly admitted to ourselves that 
others might have once regarded us in a similar light. 

It was in this year that Colonel Goodwin retired and Lieutenant Purswell came to take his place. Other 
notable additions to our faculty were Mr. J. H. Sherman, and Mr. Curtis Luckey. 

Juniors! A light is beginning to penetrate the consciousness of some of the less frivolous and more thoughtful 
of our number. "We are not here," they whispered to each other behind closed doors lest they should be ostracized 
from society for heresy. "We are not here that we should be tortured, that our lives should be made miserable from 
day to day, but to glean knowledge and understanding; for knoweldge is power and knowledge is the basis of life." 
Thus the instinct of learning was slowly but surely developing in us. and new fields of thought, formerly untrodden, 
were gradually being opened. 

"Omnem quae nunc obducta tuenti 
Mortales hebetat visus tibi, et humida circum 
Caligat, nubem eripiam." 

By degrees we were arriving at the age of discret ion. The pranks that we perpetrated as sophomores and 
juniors on innoncent freshmen seem absurd and hardly worthy of our origination. Those persons whom we once regarded 
as giants have, in our changing perspective, assumed forms less terrifying. Slowly, we are commencing to realize 
that they are not present solely for the purpose of handing out demerits (and breathing fire and smoke) but for our own 
good. They have, all unknown to us, molded our character with deft fingers. They have instilled into us some of 
the knowledge and wisdom that is their by virtue of many years of experience and hard work. They have sacri- 
ficed that we might gain. And we owe them an ever lasting debt of gratitude. 

The farther we progress in learning, the more we realize that we are just beginning. 

LANSING LEE. JR. 




XoOWER CLASSES 







co 

CO 

< 
O 

< 
PC 

CO 
H 



Class of 1938 - - Freshman Class, Session 1934-35, Richmond Academy 



ROBERT BAKER President 

JACK HAINS Vice-President 

EVAN DAVIS Secretary 

IAMES CASON Treasurer 

ROBERT FARR Council 

EDWIN BAGGS Council 



Abernathy, L. 


Buckley, L. 


Fisher, R. 


Johnson, R. 


McKenney, R. 


rfims, R. S. 


Adams, C. 


Buford, C. 


Floyd, H. 


Johnston, H. 


McLarty- Rufus 


Smailey- J 


Adams, H. 


Bugg, R. S. 


Ford, C. N. 


Johnston, J. O. 


McLendon, John 


Smith, E. J. 


Akins, L. 


Bugg, Claude 


Ford, T. 


Jones, J. L. 


McManus, V. A. 


Smith, F. 


Alridge, M. 


Bullard, F. 


Forte, M. 


Jones, W. D. 


McNair, Marvin 


Smith, R. 


Allen, H. 


Burgess, M. 


Free, J. 


Judy- Robert 


McTyre, G. 


Smit'-i, W. 


Amos, P. 


Busch, S. 


Fuller, J. 


Jumper, J. 


Neal, John 


Spellings. B. 


Arthur, J. 


Bussey, M. 


Fulmer, R. 


Katylyncki, M. 


Newman, John 


Stanford, L. 


Ashe, E. C. 


Cantey, . 


Gaines, B. 


Kearns- J. 


Norris M. 


Stark, R. 


Athearn, M. L. 


Carpenter, H. 


Gibson, C. 


Key, C. 


Ogletree, W. 


Siarnes, R. D. 


Atkinson, J. 


Carr, C. 


Gleason, T. 


Key, J. 


O'Hara, C. 


Steed, R. L. 


Austin, H. W. 


Carroll, R. 


Glover, J. 


Key, W. 


Owens, Robt. F. 


Steele, B. 


Avery, M. 


Carry, R. E. 


Goldberg, S. 


Kimbrell, C. 


Page, H. 


Steward, Jack 


Avery, L. E. 


Carter, A. 


Granade, H. S. 


King, P. 


Page, N. 


St. John, E. 


Averett, M. 


Cason, J. W. 


Grammer, H. 


Kitchens, R. 


Palmer, L. 


Stone, L. A. 


Bacon. T - E. 


Cason, R. 


Green, E. 


Krafka, J. 


Papas, C. 


Storey, S. 


Baggs, Bill 


Cater, I. 


Griffin, L. 


Krouse, R. 


Parks, H. 


Stoudemire, H. 


Baggs, Ed. 


Chalker, C. A. 


Griffith, J. 


Lamb, J. 


Parris- H. 


Stowell, C. A. 
Street-, T. 


Bailey, Bill 


Chancey, C. 


Gutierrez, M. 


Lamback, G. 


Paulos, H J. 


Bailie, R. C. 


Chandler, H. 


Guy, J. 


Lawrence, C. 


Pender, W. H. 


Strother, C. 


Baker, B. 


Claffy, Owen 


Gwin, T. 


Lazenby, James 


Pierce, P. 


Sumner, D. 


Baker, F. 


Cliett, D. 


Gwyn, J. B. 


Lazenby, John 


Pinto- Robt. D. 


Sutherland, M. 


Barber, A. 


Cloud, A. 


Hains, J. 


Lazenby- josh 


Pond, M. 


Swan, R. 


Barbin, R. 


Cloud, H. 


Hall, Earl 


Lee, C. 


Powell, H. 


Talbert, L. 


Barden, W. 


Cofiield, P. 


Hall, H. 


Lemon, T. 


Powers, B. 


Tankersley, L. 


Bargeron, B. L, 


Coleciough, W. B. 


Hall, Jas. 


Lemon, V. 


Pratt, R. 


Taylor, G. 


Barnes, C. 


Cook, J. C. 


Hamilton, H. 


LeSeur, J. 


Prouty, H. 


Teuton, Ed 


Barnes, W. 


Cooper, J. 


Hamilton, R. 


Lever, C. 


Pur.aro, V. 


Terry, L. L. 


Bartlett, W. 


Cooper, Wm. 


Hamock, D. 


Levy,, M. 


Purdy, T. 


Thompson. Eddie 


Barton, D. 


Cope, H. J. 


Hancock, J. 


Lewis, Edward 


Purvis, E. 


Thompson. Edgar 


Bateman, J. 


Corley, W. C. 


Hanson, C. 


Lines, J. 


Purvis, Olen T. 


Thompson, Eugene 


Bates, W. T. 


Coursey, M. 


Hardy, W. 


Little. H. 


Rachels. Wm. 


Thompson, Guyton 


Beard, J. T. 


Creech- N. 


Hargrove, Clifford 


Little N. 


Radford, R. 


Timmerman, Wm. T. 


Beazley, Doyle 


Crenshaw, J. 


Hargrove, D. 


Long, R. 


Ramsey, M. 


Thrift, Willie 


Belger, R. 


Crozier, F. 


Harris, F. 


Longeway, L. 


Ramsey, J. 


Tiller, Reese 


Beman, H. 


Culpepper, D. 


Harris, T. E, 


Luke, A. 


Redd, H. 


Tjovaras, Pete 


Beneteau, F. 


Daitch, I. 


Harrison, B. 


Luke, D. 


Reed, Bill 


Toole, Geo. C. 


Bentley, W. 


Daley, J. 


Harrison, Steve 


Marioni, V. 


Reese, J. 


Toomey, Joe 


Benton, J. 


D'Antignac, C. 


Harvard, H. 


Markwalter, Al 


Reid, R. 


Traylor, George 


Berman, S. M. 


Davidson, J. H. 


Harverston, G. S. 


Markwalter, C. 


Rhodes, Wm. 


Turner, Clyde 


Black, B. 


Davis, E. 


Harvley, J. D. 


Martin, C. 


Rhodes, DeS. 


Usry, Charlie 


Black, L. F. 


Day, C. 


Haynie, M. 


Mason, S. 


Rhodes, A. 


Usry, Hubert 


Black, Q. 


Deal, H. 


Heath, T. S. 


Mauldin, W. S. 


Rhodes, L. 


Usry, Ira 


Blackwell, B. 


Dean, J. 


Herrington, J. 


Maxwell, A. 


Rivers- J. 


Usry. Tom 


Blackwell, M. 


Deas, T. 


Hicks, M. 


May H. 


Rickerson, V. 


Vaughan, B. 


Blackwell, P. 


Dennis, C. 


Hochmuth, M, 


Mayo, R. 


Roberts, H. 


Waagner, M. 


Blanchard, T. 


DeWitt, R. O. 


Holley, J. L. 


Meggins, H. 


Roberts, S. 


Waddey, M. 


Bland, L. 


Dickson, C. 


Holsenback, O. J. 


Menger, Wm. 


Robinson, L. 


Ward, A. 


Eoiter, A. 


Dinkins, H. 


Holston, W. 


Meurer, R. 


Roesel, J. 


Ward, T. 


Bolyard, F. 


Dixon, L. 


Hooper, R. 


Meyers, W. A. 


Rosamond, W. 


Ware, R. 


Bonzo, M. 


Doughty, L. 


Hoover, J. 


Middiebrooks, C. L. 


Rosier, M. 


Warr, F. 


Boozer, J. D. 


Drake, W. 


Hornaday, L. 


Mills, T. M. 


Rucker, I. 


Watkins, G. 


Boswell, J. 


Dressell, R. 


Home, R. 


Mitchell, C. 


Rusch, Wm. H. 


Weltch, L. 


Boulineau, F. 


Dudley, E. 


Horton, L. 


Mitchell, E. 


Rushton, L. 


West, Joe 


Bowers, H. 


Duncan, J. B. 


Houck, T. 


Mitchell, L. 


Sanders, L. A. 


Whaley, M. 


Boyd, C. D. 


Duvall, D. 


Howard, Sam 


Mitchum, B. 


Sanders, Wm. 


Whaley- P. 


Boyd, E. T. 


Dyches, H. 


Howe, H. 


Mobley, G. 


Satcher, E. 


Widener, J. 


Boyd, Neily 


Dye, C. 


Howell, Hugh 


Moore. F. A. 


Scarr- G. 


Boyd, W. 


Dye, Paul 


Huff, G. B. 


Moye, Chas. 


Scott, V. W. 


Wilkerson, J. 


Bracey, J. 


Easterling, W. 


Hughes, A. L. 


Mulherin, J. 


Scoggins, J. G. 


Williford, G. 


Bragg, A. 


Edelblut, C. 


Hughes, Max 


Mulligan, T. 


Seats, M. 


Wilson, Wm. H. 


Braid. F. 


Edward, J. DeW. 


Hughes, W. 


Murphy, Mose 


Seigler, B. 


Wingate, M. 


Brandenburg, W. 


Ellington, C. 


Humphries, Geo. ._ 


Murphy, C. E. M. 


Seigler, M. 


Bray, H. 


Ellenberg, C. 


Hurgerford, H. 


Murray, Chas. 


Sexton, C. 


Wong, T. 


3roadwater, R. 


Elliott, L. 


Ingram. A. 


Murray, J. E. 


Shanahan, Thos. 


Wood, J. 


Brcwr., W. T. 


Elrod, H. 


Isdell, C. 


Mutimer, G. 


Shaw, J. A. 


Woodruff, Wm. 


Brucknec, A. 


Epps, J. 


Jackson, L. 


McAlhaney, J. 


Sheehan, Al 


Woodward, C. 


Bruker, B. 


Evans, J. C. 


Jennings, E. 


McCall, J. 


Shell, Ed 


Brunson, Bcb 


Evans, W. 


Jenny, F. 


McCown, Dudley 


Shoemaker, B. 


Woodward, A. 


Bryant, Billy 


Farr, R. 


Joe, G. 


McCoy, J. E. 


Silver, Ben 


Woodward, M. 


Bryant, Wade 


Fallaw, J. C. 


Johnson, E. S. 


Mcintosh, H. 


Simon, C. 


Wynne- W. B. 














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Class of 1937 - - Sophomore Class, Session 1934-35 Richmond Academy 

GRADY McRAE President 

CHARLES BRUCE . . Vice-President 

CLARENCE BASTON ... Secretary 

FAMES STOVALL Treasurer 

BILLY WHEELESS ... .... Council 

ALEX BARRETT Council 



Adkins. Sam 
Amick, Junius 
Andrews, J. J. 
Angelakos, Gus 
Ansley, H. C. 
Archer, Tracy 
Bailey, Paul 
Baird, Wade 
Baker, Tom 
Baldowski, Julian 
Balk, Theodore 
Barnes, Wesley 
Barrett. Alex 
Boston, Clarence 
Battey, Alfred 
Battle, Clifton 
Beckwcrth, Clarence 
Belding, Lambert 
Belger, Philip 
Best, John 
Bland, Richard 
Blanos, George 
Boeckman, Thos. 
Bradley, J. W. 
Branch. Eugene 
Britt, Elmo 
Brodeur, J. R. 
Brotherton, Chas. 
Brown, Chas. 
Brown, Reuben 
Bruce, Charles 
Bryant, C. C. 
Burch, James 
Burton, Ben 
Busbia, Eugene 
Butler, J. P. 
Byington, Bill 
Cape, Alfred 
Carrigan, Theo 
Cave, Leon 
Chaney, Lucian 
Chapman, William 
Clark, Robert 
Clark, W. 
Claussen, Henry 
Cochrane, Billy 
Collins, Pat 
Corbett, Joe 
Corry, Jack 
Covar, Abner 
Crawford, George 
Creed, Cleveland 
Crcuch, James 
Curtis, Joe 
Daley, Randolph 
Danforth, Ed 
DaVaney, James 



Dean, Ralph 

Dinsmore, Bi'.ly 
Durand, Vernon 
Dye, Charles 
Edenfield, Richard 
Edgy, Lester 
Elliott, Dick 
Ellis, Robert 
Eubanks, Julian 
Evans, Frank 
Evans, Tracy 
Feutral, E. 
Fine, Neal 
Fitzgerald, Jas. 
Fox, H. E. 
Fuller, Marion 
Furman, Jack 
Gardrer, W. C. 
Garrard, Jack 
Gercken, Arnold 
Glenn, Chas. 
Givens, Shelton 
Goddard, Whyte 
Goetchius, Gene 
Goodwin, Bland 
Graham, Sam 
Grealish, Lawrence 
Green, Archie 
Griffin, Herbert 
Griffin, Louis 
Guillebeau, Wm. 
Gulledge, Jack 
Hadden, ,0 
Hamby, Otis D. 

Hamilton, David 

Hamilton, Wm. 

Hammett, Chas. 

Hanley, Richard 

Hannah, Sidney 

Hardeman, Lerov 

Hardin, Jack 

Hardy, Lamar 

Harrell, Jack 

Harrison, Parvley 

Heath, Frank 

Heggie, Jack 

Henderson, Marvin 

Herlorg, Milton 

Hildebrandt, Henry 

Hill, Claude 

Hollirgs worth, Earl 

Horton, Robt. J. 

Howard, Julius 

Howe, Bill 

Howell, Lenwood 

Hudson, Leroy 

Hughes, Lorin 



Humphrey, Dan 
Hur.ricutt, Jas. 
Irglett, J. 
Ivey, H. 
Jones, K. 
Jopling, Robert. 
Keels, James 
Kelley, Jack 
Kelley. Marvin 
Kerr, Eugene 
King, W. O. 
Knapp, Frank 
Knight, Alfred 
Lamar, Bernard 
Lamb, James 
LeSeur, Ben 
Levy, B. 
Lines, Wallace 
Linson, Palmer 
Long, Boyce 
Loyal, Raymond 
McLaughlin, Bremer 
Maddox, Roy 
Maher, Marion 
Mahoney, Billy 
Mahoney, John 
Moloney, S 
Marioni, Frank 
Markwalter, Dick 
Marshall; Chas. 
Martin, Harry 
Mason, Dan 
Maxwell, Bobbie 
Mays, Wm. 
Meehan, Henry 
Meehan, Tom B. 

Merritt, Wm. 

Meyers, John 

Miller, Roger 

Mills, J. C. 

Mitchell, B. C. 

Mise, G. 

Mobley, Russell 

Mcbley, Russell 

Mortgomery, J. 

Moody, Edward 

Morgan, Jai. T. 

Morgan, Roy 

Morgan, Wm. 

Moss, Lamar 

Moye, Ben 

Murray, _Robt. L. 

Murray, Walter 

McCauley, T. B. 

McGahee, Jack 

McKie, Cliff 

McRae, Grady 



Neal, Lester 

Neiil, Wilfred 

Nixon, J. 

Norvell, Edward 

Nowell, Jimmy 

Ogilvie, Joe 

Olive, R. L. 

Ouzts, Jack 

Owens, James 

Owens, Saul 

Palmer, John B. 

Parker, Herbert 

Parrish, Charles 

Peterson, M. 

Petrea, E. 

Phillips, R. 

Philpot, DeS. 

Plagwitz, Wm. 

Pollard, Joe, R. 

Pomerance, Leon 

Pond, Edwin 

Powell, "Tim" 

Pritchard, Harrison 

Purvis, H. 
Ragan, A. T. 
Rainbow, Earl 

Ramsey, Roy 
Routon, Julian 
Redd, Al 
Reid, Raymond 
Reid, William 

Reynolds, J. D. 
Rhodes, Frank 
Rhodes, John 
Richards, W. 
Richards, Marion 
Rinker, Frank 
Rinker, Gerald 
Roesel, Max 
Rollins, Emory 
Rosier, James 
Rox, Bill 
Rucker, Jack 
Rupert, Craven 
Saxon, Tee 
Schofield, Lester 
Sccggir.s, W. 
Scott, Vernon 
Scurlcck, "Red" 
Seago, William 
Seigler, Joe 
Seigler, Paul 
Seigler, William 
Sheppard, Jarrell 
Skinner, Edgar 
Smith, Coleman 



Smith, Jack 
Smith, Roy 
Smitherman, Rudolph 
Speerirg, Fred 
Spires, Alex 
Stephens, Paul 
Stevens, Billy 
Stovall, James 
Stromeyer, David 
Sullivan, John 
Summerall, Gene 
Summer, Gene 
Swain, Irvin 
Taylor, Earl 
Taylor, Robert 
Tebow, William 
Teston, Warren 
Timmerman, J. 
Trommerhauser, Clem 
Turner, Cecil 
Van Dyke, C. L. 
Vause, Cecil 
Velix, James 
Walker, Leon 
Walker, Melvin 
Walker, Willard 
Wallace, Allen 
Warr, Cooper 
Weathers, Herbert 
Wessinger, J. 
Whaley, Chas. 
Whaley, Lawrence 
Wheatley, Sanders 
Wheeler, Clinton 
Wheeless, Billy 
Wiggins, James 
Williams, Arthur 
Willis, Billy 
Wilson, George 
Wilson, J. S. 
Wolfe, Warren 
Womack, Clyde 
Wood, William; 
Woodward, Carroll 
Woodward, Wyman 
Woolf, Harley 
Woychowski, Stanly 
Wright, Nathan 
Yee, Lum 
Youn, Ed 
Young, Billy 
Young, Jack 
Young, James 
Young, Wm. L. 
Youngblood, Leslie 



»— *-— -1 



, .^i.:*^ *.-*fwfl 



L_ 




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THE RAINBOW 35 



Class of 1936 



Junior Class, Session 1934-35, A. R. C. 



BEARDEN. CARLOS President 

THEVAOS, DENOS ... Vice-President 

STULB, CHARLIE Secretary 

KELLEY, GORDON Treasurer 

KENNEDY, WILLIAM . Council 

FRANKLIN, DAVID . .... Council 



Allen, Ralph 
Anderson, J. C. 
Askey, Chas. Moore 
Atkinson, James 
Austin, Stewart 
Bearden, Carlos 
Bedle- Robert 
Ben, Munn 
Benson, Roy 
Blitch, Arthur 
Boatright, Arlis 
Boswell, Charles 
Bowles, Dan 
Brantley, Clifford 
Broome, William 
Bryans, Iverson 
Bryngleson, Tuggle 
Bryson- James T. 
Buck, Clarence 
Calhoun, Billy 
Carstarphen, Frank 
Carter, Cecil 
Carter, H. L. 
Chandler, Brue 
Clark, Herbert 
Cleckley, John T. 
Coffield, Lester 
Cone, Lloyd 
Conlon* Louis 
Connell, Jack 
Cooper, Duncan 
Coriey, Paul 
Crawford, Harold 
Crouch, Leroy 
Crumbley, John 
Cunningham, Barrett 
Cunningham, Mell 
Davenport, Jouett 
deMedicis, Herbert 
Dicks- Harold 
Dooley, Julian 
Drane, Steve 
Dunnaway, Robert 
Durst, Frank 
Eavenson, Charles 
Elliott, Robert 
Evans, Lyle E. 
Farr, Tom A. 
Flanigan, Douglas 
Fletcher, Autrell 
Fletcher, Wyatt 
Florie, Walter 
Fogle, Eugene 
Franklin, B. H. 
Franklin, David 
Fulghum, Henry 
Gaines, Henry 
Garrett, Henry 
Garrett, Robert 



Gary, A. V. 
Gary, Edward 
Gillman- Stanley 
Granade, Raymond 
Greene, Ben 
Gwinn, Charles 
Hall, Carlyle 
Hall, John E. 
Hall, John 
Hammond, Julian 
Hancock, Charles 
Hancock, William 
Hartley, James 
Hayden- Ernest 
Hewett, J. 
Hill, Max 
Holley, Clifford 
Holley, Fred 
Hooper, Frank 
Houston, Charles 
Howard, Thomas 
Irwin, Clarence B. 
Jackson, Arthur 
Jakes, Bill 
Jenkins. Carpenter 
Johnson, Tyler 
Kelley, Gordon 
Kendrick, Edward 
Kennedy, William 
Kerr, John 
Kirkey, James J. 
Kreisberg, Meyer 
Lackman, John 
Leary, Robert 
Lee, Elvin 
Lee. Bothwell 
Lever, J. D. 
Levy, I. C. 
Lewis, Billy 
Logue, J. B. 
Lowe, Rogers 
Martin, Ed 
Martin, Gordon 
Martin, William 
Mason, Jack 
May, Wm. W. 
Metts. Andrew 
Montgomery, Leek 
Moore, Joe 
Morris, Leonard 
Murray, Maurice 
Myers, Julian 
McNair, Wallace 
Newton, Robert 
Norvel, Paul 
O'Connor, Arthur 
Owens' Donald 
Owens, Herbert 
Pardue, Billy 



Pardue, Harold 
Pardue, Middleton 
Paulk, Linton 
Peters, Irwin 
Pierce, William 
Pomerance, Elliott 
Popkin, Harry 
Powell, Lowneli 
Rae, Lloyd 
Rainwater, Bernard 
Redd, Ben 
Riley, Frank 
Roberts, Lawrence 
Roberts, J. 
Roberts, Vincent 
Robinson, Frank 
Robinson, Robert 
Rupp, Charles 
Rush, J. Wm. E. 
Sancken- George 
Sancken, Herman 
Scarr, Billy 
Scheuler, George 
Shaffer, Louis 
Silas, Raymond 
Simon, L. 
Sims, William 
Smith, Conrad 
Smith, Jack 
Smith, Mahon 
Smith. Robert 
Snelling, John 
Steed, Harrell 
Stelling, Carl 
Stelling, Herbert 
Stewart, Wade 
Stokeley, Meral 
Stulb, Charlie 
Sylvester, John 
Thevaos, Denos 
Thomas, Arthur 
Tobin- John 
Towns, Preston 
Turner, Leslie 
Tyce, Lewis 
Uhl, Gordon 
Verdery, Orville 
Waller, Earl 
Ware, Forrest 
Waters, Woodrow 
Weinstein, Abe 
Wilhelm, Oma 
Williams- C. W. 
Williamson, Hugh 
Wright, David 
Wright, Sumner 
Young, Emory 
Young, Frank 
Young, John 






THE RAI 35 




Your Library 



One of the most beautiful rooms in your school building is your library. It is centrally 
located, has a seating capacity of eighty-eight, is well lighted, and is cttractively decorated 
and equipped. In it is found your state flag, pictures and busts of some of your most beloved 
countrymen and other leaders, and trophies won by your athletic teams. 

On the shelves are found books of every kind and description. There are books on almost 
every subject that you could possibly think about or want: biography and history, education and 
psychology, travel> science, vocations, recreations and hobbies, plays, useful and fine arts, and 
many volumes of adventure and romance. Many more new and interesting new books have 
been added this year than ever before because of the library fee paid by each, student. 

A live and readable collection of books has been bought with your fees, so why> not come 
in and use them for collateral, voluntary or professional reading? Always watch the bulletin 
boards for announcements of, and advertisements about, new up-to-date books that are being 
added. 

Your library wants to help you in your school work by teaching you where to find the 
information that you need for your studies and in your future work by creating 
in you a love and need of good books. It desires to give to you through reading 
a rich and varied experience and a strong motive for reading a-d a perma-.ert 
irterest in it. Therefore, "Be less concerned with the number of books you read, 
and more with the good use you make of them." 

MARGARET BAILIE, 

Librarian 







"THE SUPERLATIVES of 1934-35" 



By ALEX DOREMUS, 
A. R. C. Editor-in-Chief 

The superlatives for this school year were well chosen. Three methods 
of selection were used to find our most outstanding students. 

The method which excited the most interest was "Stunt Night," a fashion 
show combined with a series of varied exhibitions of school talent. The 
performance "was held in the auditorium and sponsored by the Annual Staif. 
From the girls in the fashion show, the large audience selected by ballots 
the three most fashionable and the three most beautiful girls. Entered in the 
contest were fifteen Junior College girls and Tubman girls — five from each 
class. These girls had been previously selected by the vote of Junior College, 
Academy, and Tubman High School students. From each of the three groups 
of five girls were selected the most beautiful and the most fashionable. The 
three winners of the beauty contest have been awarded pictures in oar 
beauty secton. They are: Margaret Jernigan, sophomore in Junior College; 
Dean Nowell- freshman in Junior College; and Ermine Cater, senior from the 
girls' high school. 

Also from Stunt Night was selected another group of leaders. These 
came from the main show and were approved by the judges as the most 
skillful and talented entertainers. J. C. Anderson, trumpet soloist, tied for 
first place with "The Marionettes," Mary Helen Walker and Edna Harrell, 
who presented some specialty dancing. Before making the decision, the 
judges first took into consideration the amount of applause received by the 
contestants. 

Another group of the superlatives was selected by vote of the A. R. C- 
J. C. A. student body. These students were: Margaret Jernigan, most popular 
J. C. A. Sophomore; Bobby Mills, most popular A. R. C. Senior; Dorroh Nowell, 
best all-round Sophomore; Alex Doremus, best all-round A R. C. Senior; 
David Daley, best J. C. A. athlete; Mutt Bearden, best A. R. C. athlete. 

A third group won recognition, not by the vote of the students, but by 
their own ability to place themselves in the lead. They are: Glenn Ivey, 
J. C. A. Sophomore class valedictorian; Alex Doremus, Senior class valedic- 
torian; and Carlyle Hall, best-drilled cadet at the last prize drill. 










The Swan has been chosen to 
grace our superlatives, and a good 
choice it seems to be. Superlative 
represents the strongest degree of 
comparison. The Swan represents 
the zenith of grace and the maximum 
of flying speed. 












THE SUPERLATIVES of 1934-35 

1. President of Student Body Dorroh Nowell 

2. Best Drilled Cadet Carlisle Hall 

3. "Stunt Night" Winners . . . Mary Helen Walker, Edna Harrel, 

J. C. Anderson. 

4. Senior Class Valedictorian Alex Doremus 

5. Best All-Round Senior Alex Doremus 

6. Sophomore Class Valedictorian Glenn Ivey 

7. Most Popular Senior . . Bobby Mills 

8. Most Popular Freshman Katherine Reese 

9. Best Ail-Round Junior College Student .... Dorroh Nowell 

10. Most Popular Sophomore Margaret Jernigan 

11. Best Junior College Athlete David Daley 

12. Best Academy Athlete Carlos (Mutt) Bearden 













Dorroh Nowell 



PRESIDENT OP STUDENT BODY 













Sergeant Carlisle Hall 

BEST DRILLED CADET 






THE RAINBOW 



935 




Slunl Nignl Winn 



ers 



Miss Edna Harrel 

Miss Mary Helen Walker 

Mr. J. C. Anderson 






THE RAINBO 935 






ALEX DOREMUS 



SENIOR CLASS VALEDICTORIAN 
BEST ALL-ROUND SENIOR 












THE RAINBOW 935 







MISS GLENN IVEY 

SOPHOMORE CLASS VALEDICTORIAN 






THE RAINBOW 1935 




BOBBY MILLS 



MOST POPULAR SENIOR 






NBOW 










MISS KATHERINE REESE 



MOST POPULAR FRESHMAN 



■=■• ;E 







DORROH NOWELL 



BEST ALL-ROUND JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENT 









THE RAINBOW 1935 



r 




MISS MARGARET JERNIGAN 






MOST POPULAR SOPHOMORE 






THE RAINBOW 35 




DAVID DALEY 



BEST JUNIOR COLLEGE ATHLETE 



THE RAINBOW 1935 




CARLOS BEARDEN 



BEST ACADEMY ATHLETE 






THE RAINBOW 935 




Reserve Officers Training Corps 



■ja 



THE RAINBO 1935 



ACADEMY CADETS 

A blast of trumpet piercing the air, 
A mass of color everywhere. 
A snapped command, the clash of steel, 
As a stone-like army moves on the field. 
They're the best of this freedom land, 
They stand to-gether, man for man. 
They move invincible, as colors fly. 
The Academy Cadets go marching by! 

I. W. PETERS 



THE RAINBOW 1935 




Let me congratulate you on your success and extend to 
you my best wishes through the coming years. There is much 
ahead of you along the path of life. 

SAM PURSWELL, 

Captain, Infantry, U. S. A. 

P. M. S. & T. 




Believing in R.O.T.C. training as a builder of strong American 
citizenship, I am truly proud of the Richmond Academy Cadet 
Corps in its ready response to all phases of military training. 

They themselves set a high standard of discipline. They play 
the military game hard. They do not relish laxness and pam- 
pering while in uniform. They have visualized military training 
as being precise, accurate, and demanding much in a military 
way. 

Their attention to duty, obedience to authority, and love of 
order, are invaluable features of their education. 

JOHN A. LE1POLD, 

Staff Sergeant. 






RAINBOW 935 




T. RICHARD DANIEL, Colonel 



MARGARET JERNIGAN. Sponsor 



I. C. BRYSON, Lieutenant-Colonel 
ELIZABETH TRIMBLE, Sponsor 



WILLIAM DUNBAR, Lieutenant-Colonel 



SARAH SANCKEN, Sponsor 



DAVID DALEY, Major (Reg. Adjutant) 
MARTHA SANCKEN, Sponsor 







AINBOW 




CHARLIE COLEMAN, Captain (Regt. Staff) 
FRANCES BAILEY, Sponsor 



GEORGE FULLER, Captain (Regt. Staff) 
GLADYS BODEKER, Sponsor 



FRANK HOOPER, Captain (Regt. Staff) 
VIRGINIA KIRKLEY, Sponsor 



DICK RUSSELL- Captain (Regt. Staff) 
CONSTANCE FRASER, Sponsor 
















THE RAINBOW 1935 




JOHN C. BELL, 
Major 



DOROTHY HAINS, 
Sponsor 



WILLIAM O. WHITE 
Adjutant 




First Battalion 

CAPTAIN FRED TIMM Company "A" 

CAPTAIN J. C. COURTNEY Company "B" 

CAPTAIN LUTHER STAFFORD Company "C" 






THE RAINBOW IS 




Dean Nowell 
Sponsor 



Fred Timm 
Captain 



Pat Redd 
1st. Lieutenant 



Jack Krewson 
2nd. Lieutenant 



Linton Barnes 
2nd. Lieutenant 



Company A 



FRED TIMM, Captain 

PATRICK REDD, 1st. Lieut. 



JACK KREWSON, 2nd. Lieut. 



MISS DEAN NOWELL, Sponsor 
LINTON BARNES, 2nd. Lieut. 







SERGEANTS 








Alfred Beazley, First Sergeant 








Pearre, B. 




Pereyra, ] 






Bland, W. 




Kelley 


G. 




Johnson, M. 




Lewis, J. 


1ST. SQUAD 


3RD. SQUAD 


5TH. SQUAD 




7TH. SQUAD 


Jordan, J. 


Rox, J. 


Thomas, A. 




Newman, R. 


Barinowski, W. 


ASKEY. C. 


Bolyard, F. 




Chalker, C. 


Daley, R. 


Covar, A. 


Clark, B. 




Davison, B. 


DeWitt, J. 
Lackman, J. 


Goldstein, M. 
Morgan, H. 


Lemon, C 
Norvell, P. 




Garrard, C. 
Hardy, G. 
O'Byrne, C. 


Pollard, W. 


Rush, W. 


Popkin, H. 




Redd, O. 


Roundtree, C. 


Sylvester, J. 


Slaughter, B. 




Seago, W. 


2ND. SQUAD 


4TH. SQUAD 


6TH. SQUAD 




8TH. SQUAD 


Grizzell, R. 
Buck, C. 
Glickert, R. 
Hewett, J. 
Pollard. J. 
Stephens, P. 


HOLLEY, M. 

Collins, F. 
Faughnan, E. 
Farbes, G. 
Jenkins, C. 


Wilheit, P. 
Boswell, C 
Inman, O. B. 
Kitchens, E. 
Pitts, C. 




Elixson, J. 
Benn, M. 
Blandeneurg, C 
Campbell. H. 
Irwin, C. 
Montgomery, L. 


Tanenbaum, J. 


Powers,, W. 


Thompson- W. 




Radford, J. 


Wilson, J. 


Wallace- W. 


Young, V. 




Sullivan, T. 



THE RAINBOW 1935 




C. E. IVEY 

2nd. Lieutenant 



David Franklin 
2rd. Lieutenant 



Martin Wallace 
1st. Lieutenant 



Cal Courtney 
Captain 



Margaret Davies 
Sponsor 



Company B 



J. C. COURTNEY, Captain MISS MARGARET DAVIES. Sponsor 

J. M. WALLACE, 1st. Lieut. D. F. FRANKLIN, 2nd. Lieut. C. E. IVEY, 2nd. Lieut. 



SERGEANTS 

Dooley, J. Barnard, B. Haynie, W. H. 

Pember, F. P. McLarty, R. A. Slaton, 



Brodeur- E. A. 



1ST. SQUAD 


3RD. SQUAD 


5TH. SQUAD 


7TH. SQUAD 


Stelling, H.* 


Metts, A. L.* 


« Chandler B. S.* 


Sherman, T.* 


Allen, R. 


Fletcher, A. B. 


HOLLEY, F. W. 


Green, E. F. 


' Cooper, D. L. 


Fletcher, J. W. 


Jackson, A. 


Howard- T. 


' Hall, J. L. 


Garrett, R. H. 


Redd, B. W. 


Lee, E. 


' Jakes, B. E. 


* Gary, A. H. 


Roberts, L. B. 


' ' ' ?r<WALTER, C. 


Richards, W. 


Hudson, L. 


Ware, D. F. 


Rucxer, J. T. 


Stokeley, M. 


Meyers- J. W. 


Young. W. L. 


POMERANCE, E. 


Tebow- J. E. 


Redd, A. J. 


Young- E. F. 


Tyson, S. E. 


2ND. SQUAD 


4TH. SQUAD 


TH. SQUAD 


8TH. SQUAD 


Lowe* 


Gardner, W. C. ' 


Carstarphen, F.' 


Blitch, A.' 


Bryant 


Bryngleson, A. T. 


Atkinson, J. 


Cliatt, D. 


Dunaway 

GiLLMAN, S. 

Johnson, T. 


Franklin, B. H. 
Gwin, C. W. 
Martin. J. C. 
Owens, D. A. 


Bedle, R. L. 
Cone, L. 
■ May, W. W. 
Peters, I. W. 


COFFIELD, L. 

McNair- M. R. 
Punaro, V. J. 
Riley, F. C. 


■ Lee, J. B. 


Smith, R. H. 


Robinson, R. 


Wright, J. S. 


Smith, J. L. 


Wright, J. D. 


Sims, W. 


Robinson, R. A. 






'CORPORALS. 















Florence Bailey 
Sponsor 



Luther Stafford 
Captain 



Harry Mobley 
1st Lieutenant 



George Rhodes 
2nd Lieutenant 



George Marshall 
2nd Lieutenant 



Company C 



LUTHER H. STAFFORD, Captain 
JAMES H. MOBLEY, 1st. Lieut. 



MISS FLORENCE BAILEY, Sponsor 
GEORGE J. MARSHALL, 2nd. Lieut. GEORGE T. RHODES, 2nd. Lieut. 



SERGEANTS 



Simeon D. Morris, First Sergeant 



Alva Cooper 
William Fuller 
William Kennedy 



Carlisle Hall 

Edwin Hatcher 

John Cleckley 



1st. SQUAD 

Cunningham, M 
Dicks, H. 
Drane, H. 
Schueler, G. 
Smith, F. 
Stelling, C. 

WlLHELM, O. 

Williams, C. 

2nd. SQUAD 

Stulb, C. 
Crawford, H. 
Cunningham, B. 
Eavenson, C. 
Granade, R. 
Hall, J. 
Jenkins, R. 



3rd. SQUAD 


5th SQUAD 


7th SQUAD 


Elliott, R. 


Durst, F. 


LEVY, I. 


Fulghum, H. 


Carter, C. 


ALLEN, H. 


HOLLEY, C. 


Clark, H. 


Hill, M. 


Inglett, J. 


Gay, E. 


Morris, L. 


Mahoney, B. 


Murray, M. 


NORVELL, E. 


Newton, R. 


Newman, L. 


Peterson, M. 


Sancken, H. 


Pardue, M. 


Ramsey, R. 


Wienstein, A. 


Paulk, L. 


Snellings, E. 


4th SQUAD 


6th. SQUAD 


8th SQUAD 


Martin, E. 


Bowles, D. 


Simon, L. 


Bryson, J. 
Hammond, J. 
Haydem, E. 

LOGUE, J. 
POPKIN, H. 


Boatwright, A. 
Connell, J. 
Heath, J. 
Kreisberg, M. 
Markwalter, C. 


Claffey, O. 
Lever, J. 
Powell, L. 
Roberts, W. 


Tyce, L. 


Stewart, W. 


Trommerhauser, C 


Wiggins, J. 


Waller, E. 


Wheatley, S. 






BILL FORNEY, 
Adjutant 



DORROH NOWELL, 
Major 



ELNA LOMBARD, 
Sponsor 




-^^ 



Second Battalion 



CAPTAIN ROBERT GRACEY . Company "E" 

CAPTAIN ALLEN PENDLETON Company "F" 

CAPTAIN CHARLES HARDY Company "G" 




Lewis Davies, 
Sponsor 



Robert Gracey, 
Captain 



Alex Doremus, 
1st. Lieut. 



Jack Fortune, 
2nd. Lieut. 



Lansing Lee, 
2nd. Lieut. 



ROBERT GRACEY, Captain 



Brodeur 
Clary, T. 



1st. SQUAD 
Ouzts, J.* 
Hadden, 0. 
Lamb, J. 
McKie, C. 
Owens, J. 
Plagwitz, W. 
Wilson, J. S. 

2nd. SQUAD 
V/olf, W.* 
Belgier, P. 
Dyches, S. 
Hardeman, L. 
Howard, J. 
Scofield, B. 





Company E 








Captain 


■ 


MISS LEWIS DAVIES 


, Sponsor 


, 1st. Lieut. 


JACK FORTUNE, 2nd. Lieut. 

SERGEANTS 

Frank Deas, First Sergeant. 


LANSING LEE, 2nd. 


^ieut. 




Thevous, D. 




Anderson, R. 






r, E. 




Ottinger, J. 

Smith, 


C. 




3rd SQUAD 


5th SQUAD 


7th. SQUAD 






Willis, b.* 


Tebow, J.* 


RlNKER, F.* 






Bailey, p. 


GULLEDGE, J. 


Britt, E. 






Balk, T. 

EUBANKS, J. 

Fentral, E. 
Jopling, R. 
Kelly, J. 


Kelly, M. 
Mize, E. 
Palmer, H. 
Wheeless, W. 


Dean, R. 
Hammett, C. 
Merritt, W. 
Ogilvie, I. 






Spires, A. 


Youn, E. 


Purvis, H. 






4th. SQUAD 


6th. SQUAD 


8th SQUAD 






Harrell, J.* 


Creed, E.* 


McGahee, J." 






Ansley, H. 


Baldowski, J. 


Battey, A. 






Chapman, W. 


Beldin.g L. 


Brown, B. 






Hanley, R. 


Chancey, L. 


Clark, R. 






Roesel, J. 


Gerrard, J. 


Crozier, F. 






Scurlock, B. 


Goodwin, B. 


Dinssmore, B. 






Speering, F. 


Neal, L. 


Givens, S. 






Young, B. 


Rupert, W. 


Rollins, E. 



























Frances Daniels,, 
Sponsor 



Charles Hardy, 
Captain 



Harry Jeffcoat, 
1st. Lieut. 



Charles Thompson, 
2nd. Lieut. 



William Evans, 
2nd. Lieut. 



Company G 



CHARLES HARDY, Captain 

HARRY JEFFCOAT, JR., 1st. Lieut. CHARLES THOMPSON, 2nd. Lieut. 



MISS FRANCES DANIELS, Sponsor 
WILLIAM EVANS, 2nd. Lieut. 



SERGEANTS 

Charles Norman, First Sergeant 



Martin, W. 
Maddox, E. 

FOLSOM, A. 



Waller, S. 

Baker, T. 

Bills, C 



1st. SQUAD 
Woodward, C* 
Edenfield, R. 
Ellington, C. 
Kesler, G. 
Moye, B. 
Rupp, C. 
Skinner, E. 

TOBIN, J. 

2nd. SOUAD 



3rd. SOUAD 
Heggie, J.* 
Baston, C. 
Bruce, C. 
Evans, F. 
LeSueur, B. 
Moody, E. 
Owens, S. 

TlMMERMAN, J. 

4th. SQUAD 



5th. SOUAD 
Mitchell, E.* 
Boeckman, T. 
Bryant, C. 
Dara.ney, J. 
Evans, T. 

MOBLEY, J. 

Rhodes, F. 
Branch, C. 
6th SOUAD 



7th SOUAD 
Taylor, E. - 
Heath, F. 
Keels, J. 
Levy, B. 
Maddox, R. 
Morgan, W. 
Nixon, J. 
Whaley, L. 

8th. SQUAD 



Rhodes, J.' 
Crawford, G. 
Humphrey, W. 
Hunnicut, J. 
Loyal, R. 
Mills, J. 
Phillips, E. 
Towns, P. 



Maloney, S." 
Ellis, R. 
Goddard, J. 
Hancock, C. 
King, W. 
Lines, W. 
Olive, R. 
Van Dyke, C. 



Gehrken, A.* 
Care, L. 
Glenn, C. 
Houston, C. 
Morgan, J. 
Petrea, E. 
Walden, L. 



Woodward, W. 
Corry, J. 
Hardin, J. 
Hancock, J. 
Hill, C. 
Marioni, F. 
Murray, R. 




Allen Skinne.r Charles Lamback, Elmo Layfield, 

2nd. Lieut. 2nd. Lieut. 1st. Lieut. 



Allen Pendleton, 
Captain 



Eugenia Lee, 
Sponsor 



Company F 



ALLEN PENDLETON, Captain 
ELMO LAYFIELD, 1st. Lieut. 



CHARLES LAMBACK, 2nd Lieut. 



MISS EUGENIA LEE, Sponsor 
CHAS. A. SKINNER, 2nd. Lieut. 



SERGEANTS 

Leland Chisolm, First Sergeant 



Rae, L. 

Shaffer, L. 
Corr, Elmo 



Pardue, John F. 

Hall, James 

Kale, William 



1st. SQUAD 


3rd. SQUAD 


5th. SQUAD 


7th. SQUAD 


Reid, R. 


Long, B. 


Howell, L. 


Carrigan, T. 


Covar, A. 


Fitzgerald, J. 


Bland, R. 


Hamilton, W. 


Griffin, W. 


Hildebrandt, H. 


Cape, A. 


Henderson, M. 


Hollingsworth, E. 


Kelly, W. 


Crouch, J. 


McRae, G. 


Knight, A. 
Rhodes, A. 
Sheppard, H. 


Smith, J. 
Vause, C. 


Fox, H. 
Scott, V. 


Seigler, W. 
Taylor, W. 


Stovall, J. 


"Williams, A. 


Young, J. 


Warr, T. 


2nd. SQUAD 


4th. SQUAD 


6th. SQUAD 


8th. SQUAD 


DURAND, V. 


RlNKER, H. 


Swan, I. 


Barrett, E. 


Hardy, L. 


Angelakos, G. 


Dye, C. 


McLaughlin, R. 
Murray, W. 


Hargove, C. 


Austin, S. B. 


Danforth, E. 


Hughes, T. 


Benson, R. 


Graham, S. 


Pritchard, H. 


Maher, M. 
Meehan, J. 
Meyers, J. 


Carroll, H. 
Clark, J. 
Kerr, E. 


Mays, W. 
Rambow, E. 


Richards, M. 
Saxon, J. 


Whaley, C. 


Sumner, J. 


Smith, B. R. 


Wright, N. 






















■HHBi 





BILL KITCHENS, 
Adjutant 



CHARLES DALEY, 
Major 



MISS {CATHERINE' REESE, 
Sponsor 







Third Battalion 

CAPTAIN FRANCIS TILLER Company "H" 

CAPTAIN CARL HOWARD Company "I" 

CAPTAIN ELLIOTT MORAN Company "K" 

CAPTAIN JAMES HOOVER Company "L" 

CAPTAIN CHARLES TROMMERHAUSER Company "M" 







Estelle Beaufort, 
Sponsor 



Francis Tiller, William Blandenburg, Lloyd Adams, 
Captain 1st. Lieut. 2nd. Lieut. 



Gavalos, T. 
2nd. Lieut. 



Company H 



FRANCIS TILLER, Captain 

WM. BLANDENBURG, 1st. Lieut. 



LLOYD ADAMS, 2nd. Lieut. 



MISS ESTELLE BEAUFORT, Sponsor 
T. GAVALOS, 2nd. Lieut. 



Alfred Harries, First Sergeant 



1st. SQUAD 


3rd. SQUAD 


5th. SQUAD 


7th. SQUAD 


Johnson, E. S. 


Blackwell, P. 


Rivers, J.* 


Reid, R.* 


Woodward, M. 


Bateman, J. 


Roberts, S. 


O'Hara, C. 


Uaughy, J. B. 
Redd, H.* 
Mason, Sam 
Dinkins, H. 
Woodruff, W. 


Rhodes, B. 
Abernathy, L.* 
Scott 
Atkinson, O. 


Markwalter, A. 
Arthur, J. 
Guy, J. 
Easterling, W. 


Hardy, W. 
Herlong, M. 
Swan, R. 
Culpepper, D. 


Little, W. H. 


Satcher, E. B. 


Mulligan, T. 


Williford, G. 


2nd. SQUAD 


4th SQUAD 


6th SQUAD 


8th. SQUAD 


Harrison, B. 


Newman, J. 


Thompson, G.* 


Deal, H.* 


Best, J. 

Hoover, J. 
Drake, W. 
Stark, R. 
Mitchell, C 


Avery. F. C. 
Claussen, H. 

Green, E. 


Ssigler, J. M. 
Powell, T. Y. 
Gleason, T. 


Pague 
Wong, T. 
Usry, T. 
Mahoney, ]. 


Myers, W. 


Hamiltcii, H. 


Boyd, W. 


Busch, S. 


I.IOORE, F.* 


Howell, H. 


Dressel, R. 


Ward, T. 







William Hutson, 
2nd. Lieut. 



Harold Henderson, 
1st. Lieut. 



Bobby Mills, 
1st. Lieut. 



Carl Howard, 
Captain 



Judith Gracey, 
Sponsor 



Company I 



CARL HOWARD, Captain 

WILLIAM HUTSON, 2nd. Lieut. 



BOBBY MILLS, 1st. Lieut. 



MISS JUDITH GRACEY, Sponsor 
HAROLD HENDERSON, 1st. Lieut. 



Furman Carpenter Jenkins, First Sergeant 



1st. SQUAD 

Hughes, W. 
Bye 

Ford, C. 
Benetar 
Avery, E. 
Johnson, R. 



3rd. SQUAD 
Marldin, W. S. 
LeSueur, J. E. 
Carter, I. 
Lawrence, C. 
Purvis, E. 
Toole, G. 
Aldrige, M. 
Garrett, H. 



5th. SQUAD 
Harries, J. 
Day, C. 
Sumner, D. 
Powell, H. 
Scarr, G. 
Taylor, G. 
Jennings 

MlliLEBROOKS, 



G. 



7th SQUAD 
Howe, M. H. 
Ramsey, M. 
Meurer, R.. 
Eaker, B. 
Farr, R. 
Harvard, H. J. 

HOLSENBAKE, O. J. 

Wheeler, C. 



2nd. SQUAD 
Wessenger, J., 
Marani, V. 
Horandaday, L. 
Southerland, M. 
Hall, H. C. 



4th. SQUAD 
Edelblut, C. 
Dean, J. 
Ingram, A. 
Adams, H. C. 
Fulmer, R. 
McKinney, R. 
Thrift, W. 
Philpot, D. 



6th. SQUAD 
Ward, A. 
Johnston, H. 
Tiller, R. 
Jackson, L. 
Adams, C. 
Elliott, L. 
Davis, E. 
Fine, N. 



8th. SQUAD 
Stanford, L. C. 
Parrish, H. 
Norris, M. 
Floyd, H. 
Wood, J. 
Epps, J. 
Lever, C. 
Barbin, R. M. 




Margie Mulherin, 
Sponsor 



Elliott Mohan, 
Captain 



Edward Stelling, 
1st. L : eut. 



Cliff Baldowski, 
2nd. Lieut. 



Lucius Bryant, 
2nd. Lieut. 



Company K 



ELLIOTT MORAN, Captain 

EDWARD STELLING, 1st. Lieut. 



LUCIUS BRYANT, 2nd. Lieut. 



MISS MARGIE MULHERIN, Sponsor 
CLIFF BALDOWSKI. 2nd. Lieut. 



Audley Maddox, First Sergeant 



1st. SQUAD 
Bugg, C 
D'Antignac. C. 
Rosier, N. 
Hargrove, D.* 
Burgess, M. 
Gwynn, J. 
Buckly, L. 
Herrington, J. 



3rd. SQUAD 

Harvly, D." 
Pratt, R. 
Glover, G. 
Reed, C. 
Silver, B. 
Geown, J. 
Elrod, H. 



5th SQUAD 
Amos, P. 
Horton, L. 
Daitch, I. 
Lazenby, J." 
Judy, R. 
Goldberg, S. 
Lines, J. 
Lazenby, J. M. 



7th. SQUAD 
Teuton, E.* 
Granade, H. 
Smith, R. 
Gaines, W. 
Ashe, E. 
Bragg, A. 
Kearnes, J. 



2nd. SQUAD 
McCown, D.* 
Beasley, J. 
Blackwell, M. 
Hungerford, H. 
Beaufort, J. 
Key, C. 
Griffith, J. 



4th. SQUAD 
Parks, G. 
Luke, A. 
Bonzo, M. 
Lamback, G.* 

HUNCUFORD, H. 

Maxwell, B. 
Gercke, G. 



6th. SQUAD 
Luhr, F." 

USRY, C. 

Crenshaw, J. 
Daly, W. 

ISDELL, W. 

Stewart, J. 
St. John 



8th. SQUAD 
Deas, T.* 
Page, N. 
Fisher, R. 
Bryant, W. 
McAlhaney, J. 
Street, T. 
Teston, W. 



THE P 



OW 1935 




John Nichols, 


Francis Murray, 


K. Fulghum, 


James Hoover, 


Helen Boardman, 


2nd. Lieut. 


2nd. Lieut. 


1st. Lieut. 


Captain 


Sponsor 



Company L 



JAMES HOOVER, Captain 

FRANCIS MURRAY, 2nd. Lieut. 



KASPAR FULGHUM, 1st. Lieut. 



MISS HELEN BOARDMAN, Sponsor 
JOHN NICHOLS, 2nd. Lieut. 



Urban T. Koch, First Sergeant 



1st. SQUAD 


3rd SQUAD 


5th SQUAD 


7th. SQUAD 


ROESEL, J." 

Evans, J. 
Bracey, J. 


Whaley, P." 
Black, B. 
Kitchens, R. 


Whaley, M.* 
Blanchard, T. 
Lee, C. 


Fuller, J." 
Brown, W. T. 


Seals, M. 


Dickson, O 


COLCLOUGH, W. 


Gwin, T. 


Prouty, H. 


Bray, H. 


Roberts, H. A. 


Smith, W. 


Maxwell, A. 


Ford, T. 


Cason, R. 




Wilson, W. H. 


Turner, W. C 


Barnes, W. 


Dennis, C. 


Shoemaker, B. 


Rushton, L. 


Rox, B. 


Baker, F. 


2nd. SQUAD 


4th SQUAD 


6th. SQUAD 


Eih. SQUAD 


Mitchell, L.* 
McLendon, J. W. 


Jenny, F. F.* 
Carroll, R. V. 


Shell, E. * 
King, P. 


Doughty, L.* 


Akins, L. 


Grammer, W. T. 


Dudley, E. 


Holston, W. 


Broadwater, R. 


Bussey, Marion 


Corley, W. C. 


Lemon, V. 


Houck, T. R. 
May, H. 


Harris, T. 
Rhodes, D. C. 


Lemon, T. 
Ware, R. 


Fappas, C. 


Cochrane, B. 


Levy, M. 


Bryant, B. 


B : ! WELL, J. 


Neal, W. T. 


Smalley, J. W. 


Mulherin, J. 


B LACK WELL, R. 







Joyce Lawrence, Chas. Thommerhauser, T. Z. Sprott, Joe Heffernan, Joe Good, 

Sponsor Captain 1st. Lieut. 2nd. Lieut. 2nd. Lieut. 



Company M 



CHARLES THOMMERHAUSER, Captain 

T. Z. SPROTT, 1st. Lieut JOE HEFFERNAN, 2nd. Lieut. 



MISS JOYCE LAWRENCE, Sponsor 
JOE GOOD, 2nd. Lieut. 



Richard Scroggins, First Sergeant 



1st. SQUAD 


3rd SQUAD 


5th SQUAD 


7th. SQUAD 


Bowers, H.* 


Carr, a* 


Cason, J.* 


Baggs, E. 




Coursey, M. 


McIntosh, H. 


LONGEWAY, L. 


Knapp, F. 






Wingate, M. 




Waddey, M. 


Haynie, M. 


Duncan,, J. B. 


Cooper, J. 


Jones, W. 


Harris, F. 


Jumper, J. 


Waggner, M. 


WlLKERSON, J. 


Humphrey, G. 


Rhoades, L. 




McCall, J. 


Seigler, B. 


Pender, B. 


Hanby, O. 


Bartlett, W. 


Steele, B. 


8th. SQUAD 


2nd SQUAD 


4th. SQUAD 


6th. SQUAD 


BOITER, A.* 


Smellling, B.* 


Hooper, R.* 


Rucker, I.* 


Menger, W. 


HOLLEY, J. 






Bruker, B. 


Hamilton, D. 


Mobley, G. 


Ramsey, J. 


Radford, R. 


Mulligan, T. 


Bailey, B. 


Watkins, G. 


Warr, C. 


BULLARD, F. 


Stoudemire, H. 


Simon, C. 


Beman, H. 


Palmer, B. 


Sexton, C. 


Meggins, H. 


Welch, L. 


Mitchum, B. 


Hall, E. 


Luke, D. 


Robinson, L. 








Q 
< 






The Richmond Academy Band 1934-1935 




B. Moss, 
Drum Major 



W. C. IVEY, 

Captain 



Martha Oliver, 
Sponsor 



Marion Dasher, 
Captain 



Martha Wilder, 
Sponsor 



Ada Frances Davidson, 
Sponsor 

Mr. Lincul, Director of Eand 
Band Instructor 1927-34. 



SERGEANTS: 
Hartley, J. 
Mason, A. 
Stevens, B. 
Steed, H. 
DeMedicis, H. 



Marion Dasher, Captain 

H. Chandler, First Lieutenant 

T. Sanders, First Lieutenant H. Henderson, First Lieutenant 

B. Moss, Drum Major W. Ivey, Captain 

D.Adams, Second Lieutenant T. Gavalas, Second Lieutenant 

K. Fulghum, First Lieutenani B. Morris, First Lieutenant 

A. McKie, Second Lieutenant S. Saye, Second Lieutenant 

J. Anderson, Top Sergeant 



CORPORALS: 
Andrews, J. 
Battle, C. 

Curtis, J. 
Gfiffin, L. 
Pond, E. 

Wood, W. 



PRIVATES: 
Beckworth, C. 
Bentley, W. 
Blandeneurg, M 



BURCH, J. 
HOCHMUTH, M. 

Krafka, J. 
Krause, R. 
Murray, C. 



Mayo, R. 
McLarty, R. 
Cloud, A. 
Cloud, B. 
Moore, J. 
McFadden, D. 



Shhehan, A. 
Sanders, T. 
Strother, C. 
Woodward, C. 
Wynne, B. 
Joe, G. 
Youngblood, L. 






The activities of the Richmond Band were somewhat handicapped at the beginning of the year because of the late arrival 
of the uniforms. Despite this fact, the Band took part in quite a few noteworthy events. 

The Academy Band was in the line of march of the Armistice Day parade on the night of November 11. One of the 
local papers stated that the School's Band was one of the foremost features of the parade. 

The Band was in regular attendance at the football games, and staged parades during the halves of the majority of 
them. In the line of football activities, the Band took two trips to Columbia, where our team played Columbia High. The other 
trip was to Athens. There the Band attended the Georgia-Georgia Tech game on December 1. The Academy was represented 
among other schools from different parts of the State. 

Since it rained on the day of the annual inspection of the R. O. T. O, the Band did not have the privilege of taking 
part on this occasion; but we are always in line Memorial Day and at the Prize Drill. These last mentioned occasions will 
probably conclude the activities of what we consider a very full year for the A. R. C. Band. 

I. T. S. 
















PQ 

!=) 

,— I 

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<! 



HE RAINBOW 19c 



Sabre Club 



MAJOR DORROH NOWELI President 

COLONEL RICHARD DANIEL . Vice-President 

MAJOR JOHN BELL . Secretary 

CAPTAIN CARL HOWARD " Treasurer 



Members 



COLONEL: 
Richard Daniel 



LIEUTENANT-COLONELS 



R. Campbell Bryson 



William Dunbar 



John C. Bell 
Charles S. Daley 



MAJORS: 



Dorroh L. Nowell 
David S. Daley 



Timm, Fred 
Courtney, J. C. 
Stafford, Luther 
Gracey, Robert 
Pendleton, Allen 
Hardy, Charles 



CAPTAINS 

Tiller, Francis 
Howard, Carl 
Moran, Elliott 
Hoover, James 
Trommerhauser, Chas. 
Russell, Richard 



Hooper, Frank 
Fuller, George- 
Coleman, Charles 
Dasher, Marion 
Moss, Gordon T. 



Redd, Patrick 
Wallace, Martin 
Mobley, Tames 
Doremus, Chas. A. 
Layfield, Elmo 
Jeffcoat, Harry, Jr. 
Bi.andenburg, Wm. 
Mills, Bobby 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS: 

Steeling, Edward 
Sprott, T. Z. 
Good, Joseph R. 
White, Wm. O. 
Kitchens, William 
Smith, Coleman 
McIlwaine, Jas. S. 



Barton, Robt. 
Chandler, Harold 
fulghum, kasper 
Henderson, Harold 
Ivey, W. C. 
Morris,, B. Allen 
Sanders, James T. 
Saye, Sam W. 



Krewson, Jack 
Barnes, Linton 
Franklin, David 
Ivey, Charles 
Marshall, George 
Rhodes, George 
Fortune, Jack 
Lee, Lansing 
Lamback, Charles 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS: 

Skinner, C. Allen 
Thompson, Charles 
Evans, William 
Adams, Lloyd 
Hutson, William 
McDonald, Jerry 
Baldowski, Clifford 
Bryant, Lucius A. 



Murray, Francis 
Nichols, John 
Fortune, Charles 
Heffernan, T. J. 
Forney, William 
Adams, David 
Gavalos, Theo 
McKie, Albert B. 










Y-"'r "-"- 



-. ' 



Rifle Team 



KNEELING: 
Fortune, J. 

Daniel, D. 
Gracey, R. 

Moran, E. 

White, Wm. O. 
Chandler, H. 

Baker. T. 



STANDING: 
Bell, J. C. 

Dunbar, Wm. 
Kitchens, Wm. 
Fuller, G. 

Cleckley, J. T. 
Lackman, J 
Bryeon, 



R. C. 



Winners of Second Place, Corps Area Championship in the National 
William Randolph Hearst Match and First Place among Junior Units in the 
Fourth Corps Area Gallery Match, which carries with it the honor to repre- 
sent the Corps Area in the National Intercollegiate Match. 

In the National William Randolph Hearst Match. Team Captain George 
L. Fuller, scored 197 of a possible 200. the highest score in the Fourth Corps 
Area, and a "leg" on the National Individual Championship. He was also 
awarded "The I. Major General) Leonard Wood Medal for Marksmanship" 
for the highest individual academy score during the school year 1934-35. 
This medal, awarded by Mr. Landon Thomas, is the property of the 
Academy and is competed for annually. A ribbon pin accompanies the 
medal to he worn by the winner in place of the medal itself. 

At the time the Annual goes to press, official results of the National 
Intercollegiate Match are not available. The team, however, showed con- 
tinued improvement and should place well. Firing one stage weekly, 10 
rounds in each of two positions, at a one-fourth inch bull's eye, distance 50 
feet from the muzzle of the rifle to the target, their improvement over last 
year was as follows: 

Stage L'usitiuns Improvement 

First Prone and Sitting 60 

Second Prone and Kneeling 88 

Third Prone and Standing 98 

Fourth . . . Prone and Prune . ■ . . ?>7 

2$$ 



THE RAIN 




cBEAUTIE5 



Beauty 



Beauty glitters when soft sunlight plays over a 
cool lake in Spring; 

Beauty touches us when mellow breezes kiss the 
daisy blossom and the jonquil head. 

Beaut}' lives and flourishes as the days pass, one 
by one ; 

Beauty thrives and will ne'er die til the world is 
dead. 

' hi fore'er Beauty goes portraying the loved symbol 
of our beauty-loving race: 

When we feel depressed, the beauty in a child's 
word will ease our greatest sorow ; 

The Beauty of the Simplest maid will make the 
weakest bend the harder on his toilsome way. 

And Beauty, like the crimson sunset, often goes at 
parting day; but of this we feel assured: 
It'll come again tomorrow. 

Jeremiah Alexander McDonald. 










THE 




Hi H ■ 



L^oirtes'tants in lash 



ion 



and Deauiy Oh 



ow 



Reading from left to right are Margaret Jernigan, Florence Bailey, Dorothy Kelly, 
Evelyn Whitlock, Dorothy Lackman, Dorothy Jarrell, Ermine Cater, Dean Nowell, Grace 
Dve, Martha Herman, Camilla Motes, Martha Sancken, Samille Saye, Margaret Wiggins, 
and Betty Trimble. 

The Fashion and Beauty Show was held in the Academy auditorium in November. 
A packed house meant a fine start toward financing our yearbook. A hundred and twenty 
dollars net profit was made. 

The contestants won their right to enter the show through ballots voted by the 
respective classes. Five girls from Tubman, and five from each of the Junior College 
classes were entered. The most fashionable girl in each class was decided by an impartial 
committee. The msot beautiful girl in each class was decided by ballots voted by 
members of the audience. The winners mav be found in this section. 



935 




Miss Margaret Jernigan 

MOST BEAUTIFUL SOPHOMORE 



THE RAINB 





Miss Elizabeth Trimble 

MOST FASHIONABLE SOPHOMORE 







THE 










% - 



/ 



. 



1935 




Miss Dean Nowell 



MOST BEAUTIFUL FRESHMAN 






THE RAINBOW 




35 







Miss Samille Saye 

MOST FASHIONABLE FRESHMAN 






n 






• 




AINBOW 1935 







Miss Ermine Cater 

MOST BEAUTIFUL TUBMAN SENIOR 






THE RAINBOW 







ifcSr* 




Miss Florence Bailey 

MOST FASHIONABLE TUBMAN SENIOR 










rOOTBALL 












Our Doctor Friends 



AGEE, M. P. 
AGOOS, B. S. 
BATTEY, W. W. 
ANDERSON, R. E. 
BRYANS, C. I. 
BRYSON- R. J. 
BUTLER, R. I. 
CALHOUN, R. H. 
CLARK, W. E. 
CRICHTON, R. B. 
FENNELL, S. W. 
HANKINSON, H. W. 
HOLMES, L. P. 
HOUSTON, W. R. 
HULL, J. M. 
KERSHAW, M. M. 
LEWIS, S. 1. 



LEVY- M. S. 
MARRIOTT, J. E. 
McGAHEE, R, C. 
MICHEL, H. M. 
MULHERIN, F. X. 
MULHERIN, P. A. 
MURPHEY, E. E. 
PHLPOT, W. K. 
PLAXCO, J. S. 
SCHARNIT2KY, E. O. 
SILVER, D. M, 
ROULE, J. V. 
THURMOND. J. W. 
VIDLER, J. R. 
WADE, A. C. 
WOODBURY, G. M. 






Our Football Coaches 




Graduated at University of Georgia, 1S26. Captain of Univer- 
sity of Georgia Boxing Team 1925-26. All Southern Tackle in 
1926. Athletic Director at Carrollion A. & M. 1926-1932. Head 
Football Coach at A. R. C. 1933 and 1934. 



J. C. LUCKEY 




Graduated University of South Carolina in 1931. Captain of 
Game Cocks in 1931. Wearer of O. D. K. Assistant Football 
Coach of Academy-Junior College Football 1931. Assistant 
Coach of J. C. A. Football Team 1932. Head Coach of J. C. A. 
Football Team 1933. Assistant Coach of A. R. C. Football 
Team 1934-. 






R. E. Gressette 




Graduated at University of Georgia in 1922. Basketball Coach 
at Florida High School 1922. Athletic Director at Louisville 
Academy in 1923. Athletic Director Marietta High School 1924 
and 1925. Athletic Director Cordele High School 1926. Basket- 
ball Coach at Gainesville High School 1928. Assistant Football 
Coach A.R.C., 1932, 1933, and 1934. Coach of J. C. A. Girls' 
Basketball 1934. 



C. A. Royston 






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Football Scene 




Coach Luckev shows Carswell hi 



Football Schedule 1934 

A. R. C. Opp. 

Washington High 26 

Lanier High ..... 6 13 

Brunswick High 21 

Valdosta High .21 8 

Savannah High 33 

G..M. A -14 

Benedictine College ...... 7 13 

Columbia High 6 

♦Riverside 6 26 

♦This game was forfeited to A. R. C. because Riverside p'ayed 
several inelligible players. This was done by G. I. A. A. official'. 



The work of Coach Luckev in his 
two years as coach has proved highly 
satisfactory. The team has constantly 
improved. Xext year's team should 
be anions: the best. 




COACH LUCKEY 




"B" Varsity 






SITTING: 
Stulb 

H.OLLEY 

Boyd 

Cunningham 

Brodeur 

Conlon 

Lanier 

Lewis 

Johnson 

MlTCHUM 

Carrigan 



KNEELING: 
Koch 
Rucher 
Stelling 

BOSWELL 

Redd 

Cone 

Jakes 

Fortune 

Wiggins 

Little 

Nowell 

Bills 

Dunnaway 



STANDING: 
Nowell, D. Asst. Coach 

Jordan 

Tjovaros 

Baker, Captain 

Cave 

Sancken 

Royston, Coach 

Cunningham 

Allen 

Benson 

Hollingsworth 

Reed 

Kale 

Kitchen 

Daley, Asst. Coach 



B Varsity 12 

B Varsity 42 

B Varsity 32 

B Varsity 6 

B Varsity 12 

B Varsity 6 

B Varsity 7 



Warrenton 

Langley-Bath .... 

Stapleton 

Monetta 

Graniteville 

North Augusta .... 

Waynesboro 



THE RAINBO 






Royston s Ramblers 

(From Tom Wall's Column in The Augusta Chronicle) 



Seven victories for $175! 

That simple statement is a true analysis of the feats of the 
1934 Ramblers of Richmond Academy. It cost no more than 
$175 for the "B" varsity of the historic institution to turn back 
the challenge of seven opponents and at the same time to do the 
task so magnificiently as not to allow the opposition to tally a 
single point. 

So impressive were the charges of Coach Charlie Royston this year 
they came close to registering in those seven games a point for every 
dollor spent on the team. 

* ^ ^ 

SAYS CHARLIE 

"I think that's pretty good." quoth Charlie as he reflected his 
team's showing. '"A loss of $175." 

Further questioning of the Rambler mentor drew from him 
the explanation that when he spoke of "loss" he meant that finan- 
cial returns allowed him to cut only $25 from the original 
expenditure of $200 for equipment. 

"You can't consider that a loss, can you?" I asked the genial 
coach, who has just rounded out his second year as leader of the Little 
Musketeers. 

* # * 

THE COST 

Then he went on to relate how the Academy treasury had to yield 
$200 for padded pants and purple pull-overs. 

But as the writer sees it. the school has taken a long-needed 
step in furnishing Coach Curtis (Big Six) Luckey with youths who 
know a little more about football than just the fundamentals. Basic- 
ally speaking, to give him just such players is all right except that 
any experience they get will be at the expense of the Musketeers. 
The spelendid manner in which Charlie has carried this year's Ram- 
bler team forward heralds a new day in Richmond football. Next year's 
eleven should be even better than the 1934 Musketeer machine. 
Why? 
Here's the reason why: 
Warrenton 0, Ramblers 12. Monetta 0, Ramblers 6. 

Langley-Bath 0, Ramblers 39. Graniteville 0, Ramblers 12. 

Stapleton 0, Ramblers 31. North Augusta 0, Ramblers 6. 

Waynesboro 0. Ramblers 7. 
A grand total of 113 points as compared with $175 that was required 
to fit them for battle. 

* * * 

"THE WHOLE D TEAM" 

To roll up such an impressive and convincing record required much 
time and thought on the part of the coa.ch and even more action on the 
part of the players. They had to know more than how to take a toss 
from center. 

In the way of physical facts to support this contention we offer 
theRambler backfield, composed of Tom Baker, Shorty Boyd, and 
Pete Tjovaras, and Red Holley at a wing berth, all of whom will 
be eligible for next year's Musketeer team. 

Of course, the five youngsters mentioned above were not altogether 
responsible for the Rambler's success this year. Several other members 
of the team distinguished themselves with just as much glory, but the 
fact remains that the quartet were the team's stalwarts. 

^ ^ ^ 

GLORY BE THEIRS 

The curtain has rung down on the Ramblers of 1934 and glory is 
theirs. 

Who knows but what the 1935 season holds the same worlds of joy 
for Coach Luckey after these same youngsters have been given their 
chance at hoiting the Musketeer banner higher, where it will wave 
majestically in the air currents of the G. I. A. A.? 










Company Football Champions 

Company "B" 






(Kneeling— Left to Right) 


(Standing— Left to Right) 






Bl.ANDENBURG, E. 


Cunningham, B. 






Allen. R. 


Redd, B. 






Cunningham, M. 


Stanford, P. 






Johnson, T. 








Hall, J. 


Redd,, A. 






Stelling, H. 


Courtney, C. (Capt. Co. 


"B") 




Kitchen, E. 


Tebow, J. 






Dunaway, 


R. Baker, Tom (Coach) 






SCORES : 






Company 1'. .... 12 


Company < 1 







Company B . ■ . 13 


Company E 







Company B .... 24 


Companies K & L 







Company B .... 25 


Company H 




7 


Total 74 


Tutal . . . . • 




7 










J. G. McDonald, Chra. 



J. L. Skinner 



W. R. Kennedy 



R. E. Gressette 







M. T. Bryson 



G. L. Bolton 



C. A. Royston 



J. C. Luckey 



Athletic Committee 



The Athletic Committee has for several years been composed of the coaches of the two schools 
and four ether members of the faculties of the two institutions, not otherwise connected with ath- 
letics. The President and the Dean are ex-officio members of the Committee. 

The function of the Athletic Committee is, for the most part, to provide the ways and means for 
the athletic programs. It is their job to allocate the funds, from whatever source derived, to the 
different departments of our athletics. In some cases, revenue is derived from the games played; in 
other cases, no revenue, or very little, is derived. It becomes then the problem of the committee to 
work out the equitable distribution of these funds. 

Funds for the program are derived mainly from two sources. Each semester a general fee of 
$1.00 is paid by each student enrolled in the Academy or the Junior College- This is the most 
reliable source of athletic income. The other sour ce is from our football games. The amounts from 
these games fluctuate widely from year to year,, but in the last two years has been sufficient to carry 
most of the expenses of the football program. The revenue from basketball is negligable, while that 
from track, tennis, and golf is nothing. Another source from which athletics may draw is the revenue 
from the lunch room. This revenue does not go wholly to athletics, but is shared by all the different 
activities of the schools. Athletics may draw from this fund with the approval of the Board of 
Control. 

Other than the duties connected with the current athletic program, the most ambitious thing 
the committee has e\ er undertaken was the construction of the football stadium. This was finished 
in the fall of 1930 at a cost of about $21,000. About $10,000 of the amount came from Board of Con- 
trol from funds saved from the lunch room over a period of eight years; another $5,000 came from 
profits from pervious athletic programs. The deficit of over $6,000 has been reduced yearly until it is 
now near the $4,000 mark. This has been accomplished with no outside aid. but wholly from the 
incomes derived from within the school. When this deficit has been paid, the athletic program can be 
enlarged to the benefit of all the students. 

In addition to the stadium, the Committee has just built a quarter-mile track, which, when 
finally completed, will be one of the best high school tracks in the state. This track has already cost 
about $800 and will cost considerably more by the time it is finally completed with cinders. 

It has ever been the purpose of the Athletic Committee to furnish the best possible facilities and 
equipment for athletics for the students of the Academy and the Junior College- It will ever be the 
policy of the Committee to furnish to every student of the Academy and the Junior College, the 
means by which they may express themselves in any form of athletics that thev desire. 

J. G. McDOXALD. Chairman. 







The Academy Stadium Is One of the Finest in the South. 
The Tradition and Glory of Richmond Is Enhanced by the 

Beauty of the Field. 



THE RAIN 










What Athletics Should Mean to A. R. C. 

\ first glance shows that such a subject is at least four-fold even to the less thoughtful. The 
four aspects are the physical, mental, morl, and religious. The religious, which passed out with the 
Romans, may he dismissed at the beginning. 

As to the physical, one immediately thinks of the opportunity to engage in athletics of all sorts 
for the sake of necessary play- The orderly development of the muscles here under competent coaches 
in all branches that we have, gives the greatest pleasure to the participant as calling forth his best 
efforts. It should be remembered that nothing is worthwhile without effort, for it is worth just 
what you put into it Physical exercise of whatever nature one prefers keeps the body part of him 
up to a high degree of efficiency, and forestalls a breakdown later in life. Now, for those who witness 
any contest; it is their way of helping carry out our program by encouraging our teams with your 
presence, as nearly 100% as you can. Those teams represent Y< >U, and the least they ought to 
expect from you is to BE THERE. 

We must not. though, thing this discussion ends here; this i sbut the beginning. What of the 
mental side? Just these ideas: first, of habit-forming — a good thing anywhere, carrying out orders, 
"staying put," or moving around to meet any given situation. But what of the unexpected move? 
An eminent Englishman remarked that Waterloo was won on the fields of Eton and Rugby. And why 
were the Americans so successful 1.1 the World War? They were taught by our svstem to THIXK. 
Then you ask, "Why all of the eligibility rules?" Just this: participation in athletics is your reward 
for class-room work well done. No hoy who "flunks" has a right to be a candidate, because he will 
be a drawback rather than an aid to his team, coaches, and fellowmen later in life. These are life 
processes and will reflect your mental status through your whole span of vears. 

And, finally, the moral side of this topic. Dependability, "stick-ability," courage even in the 
face of sure defeat, a sense of fair play, loyalty to your grand old school ideals and traditions; these 
are some of the most valuable lessons an athlete can gain. As he plays, so will he live 

"When the Great Recorder comes to write against your name, 



"He writes not that you won or lost, but her 



>u played the game. 







J. C. A. Basketball 

KNEELING— LEFT TO RIGHT 
Dunbar, W Stulb, J. Bryson, H. 

STANDING— LEFT TO RIGHT 
Hardy, C Bell, J. C. Daley, D Pierce, F. 



Corley, G 



Seasons Schedule 



26 Hollingsworth 




18 


1 2 Evans 




13 


20 A. Z. A. . 




. 17 


12 Harlem 




13 


19 Hollingsworth 




31 


e a great deal of credit 


for the way 


they 



J. C A 

J. C. A 

J- C. A 

J- C. A 

J- C A 

The J. C A. boys deserve 
developed themselves into a bunch of star players. The pass work was 
excellent and the defense of the team clicked continuously. Team work 
was the outstanding achievement during the entire season. The quintet 
was led by Captain Daley, Bryson, Pierce, Bell, Xowell. while the first string 
substitutes are Dunbar, Swearinger, Stulb, and Corley. 

The boys started their season by defeating Hollingsworth Candy C i 
They then journeyed to Evans and were defeated. The A. Z. A.'s, the next 
victim, bowed to the J. C. A. quintet after a hard-fought battle. In Harlem, 
the Harlem boys handed them a heart-breaking one point defeat. 

The Hollingsworth Candy Co. proved to be the next victim of the J- C. A. 
onslaught, but the college lads fell to a heavy defeat. 

The invasion did not prove a tremendous success, from the standpoint 
of games won and lost, but the boys played all games in a sportsmanlike 
manner. 



tdi 



= THE RAINBOW 935 




Lettermen In Basketball A. R. C. 1934-35 






George Kesler (Capt.) 
Cal Courtney 


Guard 
Guard 


Bobby Glickert 
Charles Pearre 




Forward 


Morgan Rountree 
C.Marshall .... 
John K. Lackman 

BASKETBALL 
Leah 1 1 igh 


Guard 
Center 

Center 

SCHEDULE 


Bud Moss 
Bud Harries 
G. L. Bolton 

1934-35 A. 


R. ('. 
28 

29 
31 
30 
21 
47 
35 


Forward 

Coach 

Opp. 

17 
18 


Hollingsworth 






16 


1 [arlem I [igh 
Stapleton High 






15 
15 


Washington High 






13 








50 


Benedictine College 






24 
30 
34 
IS 
26 
15 


47 

37 








32 


Columbia 1 1 ierh 






42 


Wrens High 






20 


Benedictine College 
Warrenton High 






24 
24 
52 
27 
27 
532 

30 
28 

590 
30 


18 

1 I 


Dearing High 
Savannah High 






53 
34 


Washington 1 [igh 

Total . . . 

G. M. A. . . . 
Boys' High . . 

Grand Total 

Average 


G. I. A. A. 


Tournament 


17 
447 

28 

52 

527 

27 



A- R. C. Won 13 srames and lost 7. 



A. R. C. Basketball 

W hen the call was sounded for candidates for basketball, only four letter 
men from last year answered it- They were: Morgan Rountree. George Kes- 
ler, Bobby Glickert, and Charles Pearre. However, the other material was 
the best that Coach Bolton has had in nearly seven years. As a result of 
this, the "Musketeers" were the best team that has been placed on the 
gymnasium floor in nearly seven years. 

After live weeks of intensive practice, the}' made their debut. Although 
thev plavecl a ragged game, the Musketeers pulled through to win from Leah 
High School,. 28-17. ^ 

The}' seemed to go on a winning streak from that and won six straight 
games. These were from Dearing High School, Hollingsworth Candy men. 
Harjem High School, and Washington High School. 

They met their first and second defeats in Savannah, Ga- : to Savanntih 
High and Benedictine College, by scores of 50-35 and 47-24, respectively. 

On returning to Augusta, we found a, grim and determined bunch that 
ran out on the floor to meet Boys' High School of Atlanta. In spite of this 
determination. Boys' High managed to nose out a 37-30 victory. The Mus- 
keteers put up a real fight for this game, however. 

Carrying this determination to Columbia, S. C. the Musketeers put 
on the best exhibition of basketball that has been seen in this section of the 
country. Although 14 points behind at the half, the Musketeers got down 
to business, and took the game away from Columbia in an extra period. The 
score was 34-32. 

Columbia had the chance to seek revenge just three clays later. They 
played a return game here and certainly did take advantage of this oppor- 
tunity. They won to the tune of 42-18. 

It seemed as if they were going places in this tournament when they 
were defeated by Stapleton High School, 21-15. It had been just exactly 
one month before that the Musketeers had won from Stapleton by the same 
score. 

When Benedictine College. came to Augusta to play their return game, 
the Musketeers outplayed and defeated them to the tune of 24-18. Revenge 
war, sweet to the local lads. 

The Musketeers next encounter was with Warrenton High School- They 
again brought home the bacon with a score of 24-12. 

On a journey to Dearing, Ga., the Musketeers ran up the highest score 
of the season. They defeated Dearing High, 52-33. 

Savannah High School was the next opponent. They were met by a 
group of warriors that even looked fierce. However, they ended up at the 
big end of the score, which was 34-27. 

The next meat on the Musketeers' list was Washington High School. 
The boys from Washington put up a brave scrap, but they weren't quite 
good enough. The score was 27-17. 

The Musketeers entered the G. I. A. A. Tournament in a very high ten- 
sion. The nervousness was not so great, however, as to prevent them from 
trouncing G. M- A. by a score of 30-28. 

The next night, Boy's High School defeated them 1 for the second time 
to the tune of 52-28. This eliminated them from the tournament. 

As was stated before., the Musketeers; were the best team that Coach 
Langston Bolton has turned out on the floor. This is shown by the very 
successful season, having: won 13 rames, and lost 7. 




J. C. A. Girls Basketball 

STANDING— (LEFT TO RIGHT) 

Dorothy Adams Mattie Avis James Coach Charlie Royston 

Dorothy Newman Louise Furnace 

KNEELING— (LEFT TO RIGHT) 
Edna Harrell Ardene Mershon Mary Helen Walker Libbo Bostick 



SITTING— (LEFT TO RIGHT) 
Elna Lombard Martha Herman 



THE RAINBOW 1935 



J. C. A. Girls Basketball Review 



Coach Royston's basketeers managed to flash about the court in a big 
way this season, with lots of fast passing and shooting as well as stone wall 
defense. As for scorers, the}' had them. 

Dot Newman, the rangy center, shot baskets from every angle and piled 
up points. Captain Lombard and Herman had wonderful records also with 
their passing and fast floor work. 

The defense, led by ilershon, was a stumbling-block to every opponent. 
The guards worked like well-oiled machinery, and passed the ball into their 
opponents' territory with a lightning-like precision. Bostick was on hand 
to block any shots that might come her way. 

As first-string substitutes, J. C. A. had Harrell, James, Fournace. and 
Adams. 

The team started its schedule with six victories, gained over Evans, 
Dearing, Langley, Warrenton, and Harlem. The tables turned and Harlem, 
Kvans, and Meminger downed J. C. A. 

The J. C. A. girls redeemed thmselves by winning over Hollingsworth. 
Wrens, and Tubman. 






Season Schedule 



J. C. A. 



19 


Evans 


18 


16 


Dealing 


15 


40 


Langley 


30 


30 


Warrenton 


10 


23 


Dearing 


17 


21 


Harlem 


19 


15 


Harlem 


18 


23 


Wrens 


11 


35 


Hollingsworth 


11 


14 


Meminger 


35 


19 


• Evans 


20 


42 


Tubman 


13 




Spacious A. R. C.-J. C. A. Basketball Court 



Basketball, whose emergence from a minor to a major sport, has been 
one of the phenomena of the past few years, has come forward rapidily as a 
game which has many advantages. 

The elements of brute strength enter into it less than in football 
under the ney rules. Speed, headwork. and. above all, teamwork, are stressed 
in basketball as in no other sport. A team of basebal.1 players who have 
never seen each other could play a good game after an inning or two: a team 
of good, well-coached football players assembled from various schools has 
been known to put up a creditable exhibition: golf and tennis are games in 
which individuals are the important things, but basketball is above all a 
team game. 

Added to this is the fact it can be played at a time when other sports 
are not practical ; that it can be played at a time when nearly everyone has 
sufficient leisure; that the toll of injuries is less than in any other sport; 
and that it requires condtioning so perfect that personal fitness is empha- 
sized constantly. 



THE RAINBOW 35 



TRACK 




THE RAINBOW 1935 



■ 




Track Letter Men of 34 



DAVID DALEY . 
CAL COURTNEY . 
W. O .WHITE . . 
JAMES SHANAHAN 
ED SLATON . . 
TEUTY GRADY . 



Shot and Discus 

Sprints 

Hurdles and Vaults 

220 and 440 Yard Dashes 

Broad Jump and Vaults 

Sprints 



THE RAINBOW If 






A. R. C. Track 



For the first time in several years, there seems to be a great deal of 
interest taken in track. There are some thirty-five candidates out this 
year, and it appears that Coach Bolton will be able to mold a good team 
out of this material. Although there are only two letter men of last year 
back, the other prospects are, not limited, and are showing up very well. 

The track season has just started, and Coach Bolton has arranged for 
three meets so far . The first was with Wrens High School. It had been 
a long time since the Academy had defeated Wrens; the team was certainly 
out for revenge. It won by the score of 63 2-3 to 24 1-3. 

The second meet was a triangular meet held with Athens High School 
and Washington High School. This was the first time that the track team 
had ever met Athens High School and we were delighted with our victorv. 

Lanier High School is the third opponent. This is to be a dual meet. 
Lanier High School has been superior in football and basketball, but 
we are counting on a defeat to Lanier in track. 

The most important meet of the year is the G.I. A. A. meet, which is to 
be held in Augusta for the first time. This is also the first track team that the 
Academy has ever placed in a G. I. A. A. field meet, and there is a good 
chance that the team will "go places." 







Richmond Academy's 
1935 Track Team 



COACH BOLTON 



SITTING 
Carrigan 
Long 
Kennedy 
Katylyncki 
Baker 
White 
Slaton 
Pearre 
Sherman 
McNair 
Buck 
Moss 



KNEELING- 

IVEY 

Broome 
Nowell 
Krewson 
Thompson- G. 
"Gary 
Allen 
Lacxman 
Houston 
Chisolm 

WoYCHOWSKI 

Bush 
Howell 



STANDING 

Coach Bolton 

Murray 

Little 

Pardue 

Jakes 

Thompson, C. 

Ieffcoat 

Wilson 

Norman 

Koch 

Montgomery 

Kirkland 

DUNAWAY 

LeSueur 
Manager Inman 



THE RAINBOW* 1935 







LUTHER STAFFORD EMILE HUMMEL 



JOE STULB 



DICK DANIEL 



Junior College Golf Team for Season 1935 



This year marks the beginning of what the golfers wish to be called 
their "Northern Tour." This tour will include matches with several colleges 
from North and South Carolina, some of these being- University of South 
Carolina, University of North Carolina, Duke University. Davidson, and 
Furman. 

i< Inly three macthes played at time of going' to press). 

Annual Four-Man Team Matches with: 



March 23rd, 



C. A. 9; Yale 9: March 27th, J. 



IS; 



C. A. 
South 



Yale University 

Uyy. Yale 3^~. 

University of South Carolina, March 30th in Augusta, J. C. A 
Carolina 0; April 14th. Columbia, South Carolina. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, April 12th. and return 
match in Augusta. April 17th. 

Duke University. 

University of Georgia. 

Southeastern Inter-Collegiate Coif Championship at Athens. April 24-27. 



THE RAINBOW 935 




A. R. C. Golf Team 



Charles Whaley Sam Graham George Sancken 

Earl Waller Jimmie Lee Joe Ogilvie 

Robert Leary Sam Waller Jack Gordon 

The A. R. C. Golf Team is composed of eight men, all of whom are letter men of last 
year. At the present, the leading four are: Sam Graham, first; George Sancken, second; Charles 
Whaley, third; and Earl Waller, fourth. The other four are Sam Waller, Robert Leary, Joe 
Ogilvie, and Jimmy Lee. This does not mean that the last four are not as good as the first 
four, for these eight boys are kept in constant competition against ecah other. The first four 
leading in score just before a match is played are the four that will represent the Academy. 

Coach Charlie Royston has arranged for four meets. The first meet was with Columbia 
High School. This meet was played in Columbia, S. C. The Academy won by the score of 12 to 6. 

The second one was with Columbia High School. This meet was held here. The Academy 
won again by a score of 14 to 4. 

The third and fourth meets are to be played against Savannah High School. One is to be 
played here and one is to be played in Savannah, Ga. The golf team is planning on sweet 
revenge for the terrible defeat that Savannah High School gave the football team last year. 

The golf team is also out for revenge in the G. I. A. A. meet, which is to be held here. 
Last year they were eliminated in the first round, but they are determined to stay in the running 
this year. 

NOTE: The first match with Savannah High School was a 12 to 6 victory. 






THE RAINBOW 1935 








> V far 

Mr?*" * ff^Jr^ 1 *^ 

■»: SI! «i 

S 

John Bell Arthur Maryott David Daley Dorroh Nowell Bill Heffernan 

J. C. A. Tennis Team 
1934 Tournament Winners 

PEGGY REDD ... Girls' Singles 

C. A.. LEIPOLD Boys' Singles 

C. A. LEIPOLD AND ARTHUR MARYOTT . Boys' Doubles 

TOM SAUL AND MARGARET JERNIGAN Mixed Doubles 









THE RAINBOW 1935 




PAUL STANFORD AL REDD 



BILL KALE 



Richmond Academy Tennis Team 

The outcome of the first tennis match with Columbia shows, that the Academy has a real 
tennis team this year. Richmond defeated the Carolinians 4 to 2. "Wish" Redd, the number 
one man on the A. R. C. team, lost to his opponent, who was the South Carolina state champion. 
George Kesler, number two man, lost his set also. After some hard playing, Bill Kale' number 
three man, came back and took his set, while Bobby Glickert easily won over their number four 
man, 6-2, 6-0. 

Richmond won both of the doubles. Redd and Kesler defeated the number one doubles 
team 3-6, 6-4, 9-7. Kale and Glickert won the second doubles match 6-3, 6-2. This gave Richmond 
two of the four singles and the two doubles matches. The results of the the meet were Richmond 
4, Columbia 2. 



In order to choose the players of the team, a tournament was sponsored in which the first 
eight men were eligible for the team to be composed of four men. Coach C. A. Royston' tennis 
and golf coach, announced the following schedule for the team: 

At the time of going to press, only one game had been played. 
March 30 — Columbia in Columbia. 
April 6 — Savannah in Augusta. 
April 13— Open. 
April 20— Open. 

April 27 — Savannah in Savannah . 
May 3-4 — G. I. A. A. in Augusta. 
May 1 1 — Columbia in Augusta. 

NOTE: On the day of going to press comes the news that the tennis team blanked Savannah 
High 6-0. More power to Richmond. 



E R JBO 




Plunkett, Koch, Bearden, Fulghum, Pitts, Kitchens, young, Franklin, Kreisberg, Blandenburg, Coach Ewing 



Swimming Team 




With the beginning of spring of this year. 1935. another inter-collegiate 
sport made its debut in the Richmond Academy — Swimming. Fur some 
time it has been the desire of the Athletic Council to see this form of athlet- 
ics get a foothold in the Academy. 

Owing to a late start the team does not have a complete schedule, most 
of the available competition having full schedules, particularity members of 
the G. I. A. A. 

The formation of this form of athletics makes it possible for the Academy 
to take part 1009r in the G. I. A. A. meet, which is to be held in Augusta in 
April. A dual meet has been secured with Charleston High School. The 
A.R.C. team will be represented in the Southeastern Open Pre]) and Y.M.C.A. 
Swimming Championships, which will be held in the Atlanta Y M.C.A. on 
April 19th and 20th. 

The team is using the Y.M.C.A. pool under the leadership of Geo. Ewing. 

David Franklin was elected captain of this program. < Ither members 
of the team, who will see action are: Kessler, Kreisberg, Fughum.- Blanden- 
burg. Conlon, Young. Pitts, Kitchens, Koch. Bearden and Rox. The diving 
artists at present seem to be Young. Franklin. Conlon, Blandenburg. and 
Fulghum. On the breast stroke. Fulghum. Young, Pitts, and Blandenburg. 
I hi the backstroke. Franklin and Kreisberg. Short dashes. Franklin and 
Kreisberg. Long swims. Kessler, Koch. Rox. It will, of course, take some 
time to build a swimming team. 

The official program is shown in the following events: 

400 yard relay. Four men. each one to swim 100 yards. 

Breast stroke, 150 yards. 

Back stroke. 150 yards. 

Short dash, 60 yards. 

440 yard dash. ' 

100 yard dash. 

Fancy diving. 

200 yard dash. 

Medley relay: back stroke, breast stroke. 

team, each swimming 100 yards. 

Water Polo (optional for dual meets only.) 



1. 

2 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

8. 
9. 



ind free style. Three men on 










Cheer Leaders 



FRANK PIERCE .... 
EMILE HUMMEL 

MARGARET JERNIGAN 



Head Cheer. Leadee 

MARTHA HERMAN 
LUTHER (Bootsie) STAFFORD 



In every institution of learning, the spirit and enthusiasm possessed by 
its students uecupies a very important position. It plays a paramount role 
in all its various activities. The youth possesses that dominant urge to 
excel, striving with tireless energy when properly stimulated. He applies 
himself in his work when an optimal condition exists. This fact has been 
proved both by the old Greeks and the Romans. 

We feel quite fortunate this year in having a group of Cheer Leaders, 
with the unusual ability to arouse this above stated incentive and build up 
that all important School Spirit. 

We wish to compliment highly the excellent leadership of Frank Pierce, 
to whom we are deeply grateful ; the co-operative spirit of Bootsie Stafford 
and Emile Hummel, who have in their masterly way, added greatly to the 
success of this group's efforts; and Martha Herman and Margaret Jernigan, 
who with their extraordinary charm and acomplishment, have contributed to 
a marked degree to the efforts which have meant so much to the ambition 
of the student body. 






THE RAINBOW 1935 




Members o£ the Academy Student Body who are Boy Scouts 



"J declare the Boy Scout movement to be the most significant educational contribu- 
tion of our time. The Naturalist may praise it for its success in putting the boy close to 
nature's heart; the moralist for its splendid code of ethics; the hygienist for its methods 
of physical training; the parent, for its ability to keep his boy out of mischief; but from 
the standpoint of the Educator, it has marvelous potency for converting the restless, 
irresponsible, self-centered boy into the straight-forward, dependable, helpful young 
citizen. To the boy who will give himself to it, there is plenty of work that looks like 
play, standards of excellence which he can appreciate, rules of conduct which he mu t 
obey, positions of responsibility which he may occupy, as soon as he qualifies himself — in 
a word, a program that appeals to a boy's instincts, and a method adapted to a boy's 
nature. 

"The method of Scouting asks the boy to do something he thinks is worthwhile and 
that he want: to do. Many of the tasks are self-imposed, because the boy chooses what 
he shall undertake; many of them require practice, which he must do alone. His best 
efforts are enlisted in the acquisition of the right habit. And for every success* some 
reward is given, a testimonial that converts a universal weakness of human nature ino 
an element of strength. In Scout competition there are no losers; one Scout's gain 
is not another's loss. 

"Scouting gives no long lectures on vocational guidance, and yet it teaches the 
meaning of thrift; it maintains no jail, and yet it teaches the meaning of self-control; it 
does no preaching, and yet it teaches devotion to a cause and loyalty to a purpose; 
it is founded upon no religion, creed or sectarian doctrine and yet it emphasizes above 
all things the importance of religion. It is universal in its appeal, natural in its methods, 
progressive in its outlines, strengthened and cemented by the bonds of fellowship, and 
the idealism of the movement. Majestic in, its conception, it is neverthele.s simple and 
direct in its! appeal. I belive in it so fully that I can truly say that I would rather 
have been its author than to have been the author of any other thing I can think of-jn 
the whole field of social theory and practice of my day and generation." 



(The above is quoted from James 
College Record, Vol. IS, 11-12, January.) 



Russell, "Scouting Education," Teachers' 



THE RAINBOW 1935 
















THE RAH )W 935 



As our section on extra-curricular work will 
indicate, the activities of the Academy and Junior 
College are indeed varied. We are well represented 
in the field of debate, orator)-, literary societies, and 
declamation. Our Gold "R" and Phi Theta Kappa 
are keenly alive in the thoughts of the students. 
Then, in Hi-Y. Chemistry, Spanish, and Law 
groups — as well as in publications, glee clubs, and 
dramatics — we constantly strive to get just a little 
more than may be gleaned from the ordinary 
course of prescribed work. 







It Jl - 

- — — 

The "Rainbow" Staff 

ALEX DOREMUS (A.R.C.) AND JOHN C. BELL (J. C. A.) Editors-in-Chief 

LANSING LEE (A.R.C.) AND MARY WILLIS (J.C.A.) Literary Editors 

SAM WALLER (A.R.C.) AND DICK DANIEL (J.C.A.) Business Managers 

ROBERT GRACEY AND CHARLES HOUSTON (A.R.C.) . 1 

V . . Associate Business Managers 
JAMES BAILIE AND BOOTSIE STAFFORD ( J.C.A.) . . | 

ALLEN SKINNER (A.R.C.) AND LIBBO BOSTICK (J.C.A.) Sports Editors 

WILLIAM O. WHITE (A.R.C.) AND DAVID DALEY (J.C.A.) Military Editors 

IVERSON BRYANS (A.R.C.) AND WALKER HARPER (J.C.A.) Art Editors 

JAMES ELIXSON (A.R.C.) AND ALLEN PENDLETON (J.C.A.) Joke Editors 

GEORGE MARSHALL (A.R.C.) AND WILLIAM DUNBAR (J.C.A.) . . . Circulation Managers 
HARRY JEFFCOAT, JR. (A.R.C.) AND CAMPBELL BRYSON (J.C.A.) .... Picture Editors 

WILLIAM HUTSON (A.R.C.) AND JUDITH GRACEY (J.C.A.) Activities Editors 

EDWARD STELLING (A.R.C.) AND BETTY TRIMELE (J.C.A.) .... Advertising Editors 
MR. E. M. ALLEN Faculty Advisor 









E RAINBOW 1935 




Gold U R" Society 



Students who have earned Gold "R's" since organization. To earn a Gold "R" a studer.t 
must show general all-round ability, and excel in at least two phases of school life. 



1930 


1932 


1934 


Boyd, Welcome 


Kelly Alex 


Bearuen, ' Mutt" 


Fulton, Morris 


Scruggs, Bland 


Daley, David 


Skinner, James 


Currie, Marian 


Hoover, James 


CURRIE, BRAINARD 


Bolgla,, Julius 


Kitchens, L:ll 


1931 


Traylor, Bothwell 


Sprott, T. Z. 


Bailie, Anderson 


Bell, John C. 


Skinner, Allen 


Caswell, Theo 


Stephens, Jackie 


Sanders. Taylcr 


Clark, H. O. 


Scrivener, Archie 


White, W. O. 


Gracey, Matt 


1933 


1935 


Mulherin, Frank 


Bryson, Hampton 


Courtney, Cal 


Wade. Dick 


Coleman. Charlie 


Doremus, Alex 


Whitney, Jack 


Dunbar, William 


Fortune, ac: 


Anderson, Oliver 


Fuller, Gecrge 


Jeffcjat, Harry, Jr 


Tfc 


Forney, Kenneth 


Mills, Bcbby 


_m 


Krupp, John 


Rhodes, George 


rC 


Maryctt, Arthur 


Waller, Sam 


[V. 


Burnley, Frank 


Lee, Lansing 


JL, m. 


Harbin, Henry 


Mess,, Gtrdcn 



Gold "R u Society 

Founded April 19, 1931 



T o stimulate the interest of the student at the Academy of Richmond 
County in his school and to inspire and to insure recognition of such an 
interest, the following resolutions were respectfully submitted to the factulty 
and the student body by Mr. E. M. Allen: 

1. That there shall be organized immediately an honor s ciety at the 
Academy. 

2. That the name of this society shall be The Gold Letter Society. 

3. That the members shall be awarded gold letters as designation of 
the hon r. 

4. That each candidate fur adm ssion shall meet the approval of the 
Committee in regards to character. 

5. That any student shall be eligible for this examination who shall 
have passed or earned forty points from the specified groups- 

6. That at least ten points shall be earned in each of two groups and 
five in another. (These points are not to be made in the character group). 

7. That there shall be five groupings of honors: Character, Scholar- 
ship, Military, Athletics, and School Activities. 

8. That there shall be no regular meetings, but rather a simple initia- 
tion in chapel at the regular morning exercises. 

9. That the members themselves shall conduct the initiation ceremonies. 

10. That the society shall have the right to present any member to the 
faculty comrti-ttee for dismissal from its body because of failure to live up to 
standards of the group headed as Character: such a member dropped must 
sunender his Gold "R." 

11. That amendments to these resolutions shall come before the ap- 
pointed committee cf the faculty. 

12. That the candidate must have reasonable success in his studies at 
the time of application. 

13. That at least three points must be made in the scholastic group, 
and that at least five points must be made in School Activities- 

14. That the points for honors shall be made according to a scale 
supplied by the Committee. 



A student has many opportunities to show his ability. As many as 
fifteen points may be earned in one term in the scholastic group. These 
points are awarded for excellence in studies. The Student Activities Group 
includes such possibilities as being member or leader of various organizations. 
All boys who attain recognition in any of the school athletics are given points 
toward the necessary total. Credit may also be obtained by achievement of 
the rank .of officer in the R.O.T.C. 

Since the four.:! -?.g < f il.c S: e'ety, Mr. Allen has devoted untiring efforts 
to its devel pment and maintenance, and has made :"t the outstanding honour 
organization of the Academy. 










Phi Theta Kappa 



BOECKMAN 



DYE 



JACKSON 



JOE 



MARYOTT 



OUZTS 



STEPHENS 



TRIMBLE 






(National Junior College Honorary Scholarship Society. Approved by the American Association 
Junior Colleges. Phi Theta Kappa corresponds to Phi Beta Kappa of Senior Colleges). 

BETE XI CHAPTER AT THE JUNIOR COLLEGE OF AUGUSTA. ESTABLISHED 1932. 



1932 

(Charter Members 
Eleanor Bearden 
Brainerd Currie 
Morris Fulton 
Josephine Fry 
Llewellen Gibson 
Frank Harris 
Amelia Sheftall 
James Skinner, Jr. 
Frances Garten 
Albert Whittle 



1933 

Helen Derrick 

Elizabeth Elkins 

Dean Eric Hardy 
(Honorary; 

Berdie Ella James 
Morris Marks 
Pres. J. L. Skinner 
(Honorary) 

Martha Walker 
Jack Whitney 



1934 

Katherine Bishop 
Louise Blackstone 
Frank Grady 
juanita haynie 
Roberta Ingle 
Ruth Jones 
Alex Kelly 
Elizabeth Lee 
Neal O'Shea 
Katherine Rawls 
Carolyn White 
Jonnie Mae Witt 



1935 

Glenn Ivey 

Anna Louise Boeckman 
Helen Ouzts 
Elizabeth Trimble 
Grace Winifred Dye 
Frances Joe 
Judith Gracey 
Virginia Stephens 
Julia E. Jackson 
Arthur Maryott 










Student Council 



(Representatives By Classes) 



DOHBOH NOWELL 



J. G. Bailie 



Bobby Mills 



"Mutt" Bearden 



Grady McRae 



Bobby Baker 



JUNIOR COLLEGE SOPHOMORES 
Luther Stafford 

JUNIOR COLLEGE FRESHMEN 
David Daley 

ACADEMY SENIORS 
Elliott Moran 

ACADEMY JUNIORS 
William Kennedy 

ACADEMY SOPHOMORES 
Alex Barrett 

ACADEMY FRESHMEN 
Ed Baggs 



Henry Harbin 



Dean Nowell 



Wm. 


O. White 


David Frankin 


Billy 


Wheeless 




F. Farr 












BCT 35 



The Junior College Pre-Law Club 

CHARLES DALEY President 

CHARLES HARDY . . Vice-President 

PRANK PIERCE Secretary 

MILTON LUCKEY Treasurer 



Second Term Officers 

CARL HOWARD President 

CHARLES HARDY Vice-President 

CHARLES DALEY . Secretary 

LUTHER STAFFORD Treasurer 



Members 



James Hungerpiller 
John C. Bell 
Fred Scott 
William Dunbar 
Carl H dward 



Luther Stafford 
Frank Piercz 
Charles Daley 
Charles Hardy 
I^ilton Lucsey 



William Joplin 
Richard Towill 
Harold Chandler 
George Fuller 
Lloyd Adams 
Martin Wallace 



A pre-law club is primarily for the benefit of its members, so that they 
may delve into the fundamental points of their chosen life-work. Our pur- 
pose is to inculcate in each lawyer-to-i.e a I ve and a fascination for the 
career he has elected to follow. 

We frankly admit that we are almost totally ignorant of the laws and 
statutes of our state and union. But < ur goal is to alleviate the ignorance 
which is ours and the mystery with which we are surrounded so far as law 
itself is concerned. 

Sad is the plight of the man who enters a profession without first having" 
at least a smattering knowledge of what lies before him- When the time 
arrives for our mem' ers to enter the higher schools of law, the Junior Col- 
lege Pre-Law Club will have given to us, even though it be brief, the smat- 
tering knowledge that will place us on a plane a mite higher. 

Our purpose has been established ; our goal has been pursued and gained 
upun ; but then — we liken our pursuit to that of the search for the 
"Holy Grail." 

—CHARLES DALEY. 










ft 



% 




E RAIN 






RHO CHI 



Officers 



HENRY HARBIN 
WILLIAM STEED 
HAMBY MIZE 
PAUL PRITCHARD 



Charles Bailey 
Clyde Barnhill 
Robert Barton 
Joe Baird 
Hampton Bryson 
Ben Burns 
Kerry Foster 
Richard Halford 
Henry Harbin 



Members 



Hamby Mize 
Bill Kitchen 
Edward Leaphart 
Paul Pritchard 
Ralph Pritchard 
Richard Russell 
Donald Radford 
William Steed 
Henry Stedman 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



The Rho-Chi was organized five years ago for the purpose of promoting 
friendship among the students interested in medicall science. The organiza- 
tion introduces, in an informal way, the study of medicine. From the wide 
field that is touched upon, the students are given opportunities for choosing 
the work in which they might wish to specialize. Noted doctors from the 
Medical Department of the University of Georgia are among the splendid 
lecturers who speak to the Rho Chi- This organization stands for character- 
building, the setting of ideals, and the preparing of the medical men of 
tomorrow. 



Faculty Advisors 









Mr. H. O. Read 



Dr." J. M. Ellis 



Mr. C. A. Scruggs 




Debating Team 



McLarty, R. Tyson, Sam Chandler, Harold Mitchell, C. H. , Coach 

McDonald, J. Scavens, Mitchell Hoover, James 



The 1934 A.R.C. Debating and Declamation Team 

The subject for the 1934 debate was: "Resolved, that the United States 
should adopt the British system of radio control and operation." The affirma- 
tive side was composed of Robert McLarty and Sam Tyson, the alternate 
speaker being James Hoover. The negative side was represented by Harold 
Chandler and Mitchell Scavens. These were ably seconded by Jerry McDon- 
ald. This team competed in the G. I. A. A. meet held in Savannah. April 
17 and 28, 1934, in which teams from Atlanta, Savannah. Macon, and Augusta 
were entered. Robert McLarty represented the Academy in declamation 
with his speech, "Louis Napoleon." Mitchell Scavens won the Debater's 
Cup for the year 1934. The team was coached by Mr. Charles H- Mitchell. 



SSks£S553s3BES 




Academy Literary Society 

Officers 



FOR TERM BEGINNING SEPTEMBER: 

Alex Doremus President 

Jeremiah McDonald . . Vice-President 

Samuel Waller Secretary 

Edward Stelling .... Treasurer 



FOR TERM BEGINNING FEBRUARY: 

Samuel Waller President 

Jeremiah McDonald . . . Vice-President 

Samuel Tyson Secretary 

Paul Bailey Treasurer 



Members 



Allen, R. 
Antonakos, C. 
Bailey, P. 
Barbin. R. 
Barrett, A. 
Boeckman, T. 
Bruce, C. 
Byington, B. 
Bryson, J. 
Carrigan, T. 
Chaney, L. 
Claussen, H. 
Crawford, G. 
Doremus, A. 
Elliott, D. 
Elliott, R. 
Fletcher, J. 
Gary, B. 
Goodwin, B. 
Goetchius, B. 
Grizzell, R. 
Hamilton, W. 



Hamilton, D. 
Heffernan, T. 
Hill, M. 
Holley, M. 
Hollingsworth, E. 
Hooper, F. 
Jakes, W. 
Jeffcoat, H., Jr. 
Lazenby, J. 
Kennedy, W. 
Kitchen, E. 
Koch, IT. 
Lever, J. 
Levy, I. 

Markwalter, D. 
Mason, A. 
Maxwell, B. 
McDonald, J. 
"McRae, G. 
McLarty, R. 
Merritt, W. 

MOBLEY, J. 

Morris, A. 



Moss, G. 
Norvell, E. 
Pardue. J. 
Riley, F. 
Sheridan, T. 
Simon, L. 
Smith, B. 
Stelling, E. 
Stelling, H. 
Stulb, C. 
Sullivan, J. 
Tyson, S. 
Verdery, O. 
Waller, E. 
Waller, Sam 
Warr, C. 
Weinstein, A. 

WlLHEIT, P. 

Wheeless, B. 
Wilson, J. 
Woodruff, W. 
Sims, W. 
Wheeler, C. 




Freshman Literary Society 



Officers 



FIRST SEMESTER: 



Ed Baggs 
George Traylor 
Jack Hains 
Joseph Krafka 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Chairman Program Com. 



SECOND SEMESTER: 

Irvin Daitch President 

Russell Carroll . . . Vice-President 

Carl Simon Secretary 

George Traylor . Chairman Progham Com. 



Members 



Baggs, E. 
Beman, H. 
Blackwell, M. 
Bowers, H. 
Bruker, B. 
Bryant, W. 
Carroll, R. 
Carpenter, H. 
Daitch, I. 
Elliott, L. 
Gaines, W. 
Goldberg, S. 



Griffith, J. 
Gwin, T. 

GWYNN, J. 

Hains, J. 
Hall, H. 
Harvley, J. 
Harris, F. 
Haynie, M. 
Hochmuth, M. 
Horton, L. 
Jumper, J. 
Krafka, J. 



Lemon, T. 
Luke, D. 
Mariana, V. 
McCowan, D. 
McIntosh, H. 
Mulherin, J. 

MURPHEY, M. 

Rhodes, L. 
Rucker, I. 
Simon, C. 
Traylor, G. 




ifjfei&iL 




J. C. A. Literary Society 

Officers 



FIRST SEMESTER: 
Mary Frances Kennedy . . . President 
Carl Howard .... Vice-President 
{Catherine Krafka . . Secretary-Treasurer 



SECOND SEMESTER: 



Marguerite Kay 
Anna Boeckman 
James Hoover . 
Mary Linson 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary -Treasurer 

Assistant Secretary 



Bailie, Frances 
Banks, Freda 
Baird, J. D. 
Boeckman, Anna 
Cheeks, Phoebe 
Cowan, Ruth 
Doyle, John 
Edmunds, Ann 
Gillman, Hannah 
Farr, Charles 
Fournace, Louise 
Halford, Dick 
Harbin, Thelma 
Hardy, Wadelle 
Harper, Walker 



Members 

Harris, Ruth 
Hill, Jenny Ruth 
Hoover, James 
Hungerpiller, Jim 
Jackson, Julia 
James, Mat 
Kay, Marguerite 
Kennedy, Mary 
Lee, Eugenia 
Levkoff, Doris 
Linson, Mary 
Marks, Bernard 
Mulcay, Mary 
Ouzts, Helen 
Pritchard, Paul 



Punaro, Angelo 
Punaro, Itala 
Ouarles, Vivian 
Pirkle, Norma 
Scott, Fred 
Saye, Samille 
Skinner, Elizabeth 
Stephens, Virginia 
Stelling, Emily 
Trimble, Betty 
Wallace, Carolyn 
Whitaker, Myrtle 
Willis, Mary 
Wright, Betty 
Walker, Mary Helen 
Toole, Gus 






p" 




Y. W. C. A. 



Officers 

MARGARET HOLLINGSWORTH President 

DOROTHY BRACEY / Vice-President 

SAMILLE SAYE Secretary-Treasurer 

J. C. A - - Y. W. C. A. Roster 



Susan Barnes 
Dorothy Bracey 
Mary Caver 
Mary Givens 
Edith Halford 
Thelma Harbin 
Ruth Harris 
Norma Ellen Hicks 
Mary Holland 



Katherine Holley 
Margaret Hollingsworth 
Katherine Hurst 
Frances Joe 
Marguerite Kay 
Katherine Kitchen 
Dorothy Kelly 
Marie Mize 
Sarah Morgan 
Mary Mulcay 



Norma Pirkle 
Pauline Scarboro 
Samille Saye 
Emily Stelling 
Virginia Stephens 
Louis Sylvester 
Virginia Videtto 
Martha Wlder 
Winifred Woodward 
Betty Wright 



Sponsors Y. W. C. A. 



Miss Emma Twiggs Miss Margaret Bailie 

Mrs. Roy Smith .... Mrs. C. A. Scruggs 

Mrs. E. W. Hardy Mrs. J. L. Skinner 







\MI 




















4iJh 




Junior College Hi-Y 



FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS: 



SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS: 



John C. Bell 


President 


R. Campbell Bryson . . . President 


Carl W. Howard . . Vice-President 


John C. Bell .... Vice-President 


R. Campbell Bryson .... 


Secretary- 


Dick Daniel Secretary 


Dick Daniel 


Treasurer 


Dorroh L. Nowell .... Treasurer 




Members 


Charles Hardy 




W. C. Ivey 


Augustus Corley 




Martin Wallace 


Grady Corley 




Pat Redd 


David Daley 




Charles Coleman 


Charles Daley 




W. C. Steed 


Emile Hummel 




Alva Cooper 


Luther Stafford 




William R. Dunbar 


Reed Wynn 




Joe Stulb 




FACULTY 


ADVISORS: 


H. O. Read 


E. M. 


Allen G. W. Ewing 



RAINB 







Academy Hi-Y 



Officers 



FIRST SEMESTER: 
Allen Skinner . . . Presiden 

Alva Cooper 
Bill White .... 



SECOND SEMESTER: 

Allen Skinner President 

Vice-President Bill White Vice-President 

Secretary Urban Koch Secretary 



Gordon Kelly 



Treasurer William Hutson 



Treasurer 



Members 



Robert Gracey 
John Hall 
William Hutson 
Urban Koch 
William Jakes 
Earl Hollingsworth 
Robert McLarty 



Frank Robinson 
Allen Skinner 
Gordon Kelly 
Guiton Thompson 
James Wiggins 
Billy Willis 
Coleman Smith 



Jack Ouzts 




O. B. Verdery 


Max Roesel 


Lansing Lee 


Bill White 









_ 




Richmond Hi-Y 



OFFICERS OF FIRST SEMESTER: 



OFFICERS OF SECOND SEMESTER: 





President Charles Thompson . . ' . . President 


Bobby Mills Vies 


-President Alex Doremus .... Vice-President 


Earle Kitchen 


Secretary Earle Kitchen Secretary 


Jimmie Lee 


Treasurer Sam Waller Treasurer 


Sam Waller 


Scribe Lewis Newman Chaplain 








FACULTY ADVISORS: 


J. M. Robertson 


Dr. J. M. Ellis G. W. Ewing 




Members 


Charles Thompson 


Grady McRae 


Alex Doremus 


Charles Brotherton 


Earle Kitchen 


Jimmie Nowell 


Jimmie Lee 


Lewis Newman 


George Rhodes 


Clarence Irwin 


George Sancken 


Charles Fortune 


Herman Sancken 


Jack Fortune 


Sam Waller 


Joseph Heffernan 


Tom Baker 


Jimmie Elixson 


Charles, Stulb 


Treutlen Grady 


Sam Graham 


Bobby Mills 


Al Redd 


David Franklin 











AINBOW 935 





A. R. C. -J. C. A. Orchestra 



MR. A. E. ANDERSON 



Director 



PIANO: 
Kathleen Byers 

SAXOPHONE: 
Joe Cjftis 
Marion Dasher 
R. Barton 
D. Kirkpatrick 
T. Saiiders 

TRUMPET: 
J. C. Anderson 
C. Eattle 
W. C. Ivey 



DRUMS: 
D. McFaden 

VIOLIN: 
B. Bruker 

BASS: 
K. Chandler 

BANJO: 
Louise Fournace 







Varsity Club 



Officers 



AVID DALEY 




President 


ENRY HARBIN 




Vice-President 


BBO BOSTICK 




Secretary 




Members 




F. Tiller 


L. Stanford 


G. Sancken 


T. Grady 


John C. Bell 


B. Joplin 


K. Fulghum 
J. Plunkett 


J. Lackman 
G. Kesler 
H. Bryson 


D. NOWELL 

Bobby Mills 

E. Slaton 


C. Bearden 


C. Courtney 


Bill White 


S. Waller 


M. Rountree 


J. Stulb 


E. Waller 


I. Shanahan 


B. Kitchens 


E. Moran 


R. Glickert 


E Hummel 


J. J. Carswell 


Elna Lombard 


A. Redd 


Gus Corley 


C. Pearre 


P Stanford 










The Alembic Chemistry Club 



Officers 



FIRST 


SEMESTER 


SECOND 


SEMESTER 






Henry Harbin 
Laun Graham 




Raworth Walker 


Vice-President 


Vice-President 


Taylor Sanders 


Secretary 


Walker Harper 


Secretarv 


Margie Mulherin 


Treasurer 


Margaret Jernigan 


Treasurer 


C. A. Scruggs 






Faculty Adviser 




Merr 


bers 




Barnes 


Curry 


Mershon 


Scarboro 


Bodeker 


Givens 


McLin 


Scott 


Bracey 


Good 


MlZE 


Sprott 


Blum 


Hicks 


PRITCHARn 


VlDETTO 


Baird 


Kelly 


D~--- 


Whitaker 


Chandler 


Lemon 


Seago 


Wright 











III 



SiM 4 



»-% a* ^ <&* f- --m ^j 

p r a (S £ *>£> 





Cervantes Club Spanish Club 

VIRGINIA WORSHAM President 

VERDERY CLARK Vice-President 

JOHN DOYLE Secretary and Treasurer 

A. B. PUNARO Sergeant-at-Arms 

D. F. McDOWELL Faculty Advisor 



Antonokas, Cris 
Boozer, June 
Clark, Verdery 
Cowan, Ruth 
Curry, Frances 
Doyle, John 
Epps, Jewelene 
Fortune, Charles 
Fortune, Jack 



Members 



Hook, Beverly 
Lamback, Charles 
Lang, C A. 
Meurer, Mary 
Mobley, James 
Pereyra, James 
Popkin, Herman 
Punaro, Angelo 
Worsham, Virginia 



Punaro, A. B. 
Rhodes, George 
Tebow, James 
Toole, Gus 
Sanders, Taylor 
Stafford, Luther 
Steeling, Ed. 
Whitaker, Myrtle 










The Musketeer 



(The Musketeer is Published Monthly by the Students of The Junior College of Augusta 
and The Academy of Richmond County). 



FIRST SEMESTER STAFF 



James Hoover 
Alva Cooper 
Urban Koch 
Carl Hov/ard 
Milton Luckey 
Elizabeth Dula 



. Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 
Associate Editor 
Business Manager 
Sports Editor 
Exchange Editor 



Dean Nowell 
Dick Daniel 
Taylor Sanders 
Margaret Wiggijs 
Marion Dasher 
Earle Kitchen 



Humor Editor 

Military Editor 

Asst. Business Mgr. 

Asst. Business Mgr. 

Circulation Mgr. 

Asst. Circulation Mgr. 



Faculty Advisors 



G. M. SCOTT 

A. G. OWENS 



O. W. CHANDLER 
A. E. ANDERSON 



James Hoover 
Alva Cooper 
Urban Koch 
Sam Waller 
Libbo Bostick 



SECOND SEMESTER STAFF 



. Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Associate Editor 

Business Manager 

Sports Editor 

Harry Jeffcoat, Jr. 



Coleman Smith 
Dean Nowell 
Dick Daniel 
Bobby Mills 
Margaret Wiggins 
Asst. Circulation Mgr. 



Asst. Business Mgr. 

Humor Editor 

Military Editor 

Circulation Manager 

Asst. Business Mgr. 



THE R 











HmM 



ej 



A. R. C. - J. C. A. Glee Club 



Bailey, Frances 
Baird, J. D. 
Banks, Freida 
Bell, John R. 
Doyle, John 
Epps, Jewelene 
Fournace, Louise 
Goodson, Elaine 
Halford, Edith 
Harrison, Wynooa 
Holley, {Catherine 
Hoover, James 
Hudson, Leroy 



Joe, Frances 
King, W. O. 
Koch, Urban 
Lee, Eugenia 
Linson, Mary 
Mize, Hamby 
Pritchard, Ralph 
punaro, itala 
Sanford, Mary Dell 
Sanders, Taylor 
Stephens, Paul 
Wallace, Martin 
Worsham, Virginia 



James. Mattie Avice 
Joe Wilson, Property Manager. 







Embryonic Pedagogues 






Officers 

MARTHA WILDER President 

ELEANOR JOHNSON Vice-President 

MARY LINSON Secretary and Treasurer 

MR. C. G. CORDLE Faculty Advisor 



Cheek, Phoebe 
Dye. Grace 
Gillman, Hannah 
Holland, Mary 
James, Miriam 



Members 



Johnson, Eleanor 
Linson, Mary 
Pardue, Margie 
Weeks, Gertrude 
Wilder, Martha 



Harrison, Wynona 
Worsham, Virginia 

Honorary Members: 
Miss Boggs 
Mr. Galloway 







Ou{ O" me ideals and iradihons 
o( Ihe Old Ooulh have come 
ikese Unusual (^landi 



lies 









u 



Saxon-Cullum Shoe Co. 



ALWAYS 



BUSY 



WE REFER WITH PRIDE TO THE FOLLOWING 
EDITORIAL, PUBLISHED BY THE AUGUSTA CHRO- 
NICLE, THE SOUTH'S OLDEST NEWSPAPER; ON 
THE OPENING OF OUR NEW STORE. 

THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE— 



ittrlp 



co. 



2300 
2301 
2303 



use for 

)ther- 

blisbed 



;ince ) 
4.50 



u>paper 

ien the 

'o join 

cava- 

> that 

'liere 

mber 

.il of 

i nec- 
people 
nected 
erican 
done 

ation. 

hings 

f the 
who 
e love 
imu li- 
near 
love- 
i are 
,f the 
ir 

jn off 

lowing 

Presi- 

neld at 

Wed- 

. order 

co-op- 

of its 

. writ- 

?tuart, 

•i the 

1 be 



A Community Institution 

Back in 1916 a very modest shoe store was be- 
gun in this city by two very progressive shoe men. 
This dimiutive establishment has grown into one 
of the greatest stores in the entire South and as 
far as Augusta is concerned has become a com- 
munity institution. 

The Chronicle is very happy to record the prog- 
ress of Saxon-Cullum Shoe Company because in 
doing this we not only call attention to what two 
mide-awake progressive Augustans can do, but we 
-re also recording progress in the community. 

When a store comes to be such an establishment 
as the new home of Saxon-Cullum Shoe Company 
then it becomes a matter of community pride and 
we know that there is not a single contemporary 
of this firm in the shoe business of Augusta that 
will not gladly coincide with the statement of 
thi; newspaper in paying tribute to the great 
store. 

When anj' store in any line attains the success 
and magnitude that Saxon-Cullum Shoe Company 
has in its shoe line, it means that such a store will 
draw people to Augusta from a wide trading radius. 
Augusta has other stores in other lines of a similar 
character but at this moment we are drawing at- 
tention to Saxon-Cullum because it will soon for- 
mally open in its magnificent new home in the 
heart o Broadway's busiest shopping section. 

The story of the growth of Saxon-Cullum Shoe 
r O""p°ny, headed by Messrs. G. Allen Saxon and 
St. Julian Cullum, is a romance in the business life 
of Augusta and proof that there is opportunity here 
for those who are aggressive, energetic, capable 
and honest. 

Messrs. Saxon and Cullum are too well known to 
this community for us to elaborate on their person- 
pi nua'.i icPticns. Suffice to :ay that they have by 
brain", energy, business ability and character built 
a great store that is a community asset. 

Newspaper advertising has been one of the main 
factors in the outstanding success of Saxon-Cullum 
Shoe Company and both Messrs. Saxon and Cullum 
and their large force of between thirty and forty 
people all pay tribute to what the newspapers of 
Augusta have done to make a small shoe business 
' ecome a shoe emporium of such size and dignity 
that there are none that can equal it in the entire 
South. 



Who 
Whale 
of NI 
terday, 
in talki 
in New 
ca'led 011 
of the ' 
len tried 
hack tc 
ployers 
men as 
to the 

Very 
deed the 
garment 
country 
est in * 
as a nil 
vou til 
it. Sti 

It WL 

hear D 
Internal 
ginning 
wise fit 
to eat p 

"It ta' 
after w< 
this tr 
te tell 

Juli 
garmei 
that tlu. 
that migi 
on the 
that srr 
loose, ! 

Ten 
ployers 
strikers 
NRA ea 
the strei 

You ^ 
be very 
assume 

On t' 
Worker; 
dition to 
making g 
almo ma' 
these exl 
country i 
connectic 

When i 
is the fac 
may be o) 

One of 
ments ton" 
is after a. 
these bein 
ut memb' 
: either 



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GCI i hi: SHOPPE 

J olitils N our Patronaqc 

REAL FOOD & 
REAL SERVICE 



CORNER OF 8th Si ELLIS STREETS 



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COLLEGE MEN— 

YOUNG MEN 

HIGH SCHOOL MEN 

W I L I I I > u 

LEWS CLOTHES 

STYLED 

Up To The Minute NOT Down To A Price 

J. WILLIE LEVY Co., Inc. 

756 BROAD STREET 



Q^cc 



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30CV 




J Serving all the nation, Atlantic Greyhound bus 
° service brings the finest attractions of vacation 

I time within" easy reach of the most modest 
o budget. 

ATLANTIC 

Greyhound 

* nacrous 



/50C 
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COMPLIMENTS 



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Clau 



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awrence 



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Construction 
Company 

Builder's of the 

ACADEMY STADIUM 






AUGUSTA COLLEGE 
of COMMERCE 

320-21-22 Montgomery Building 

Phone 2941— P. O. Box 67 

Augusta, Georgia 

"THE SCHOOL THAT GETS RESULT" 

General Business Senior Accounting 

Secretarial Courses Junior Accounting 

Commercial School Stenographic 

Office Training Courses 



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Compliments Of 

DR. HENRY I. GODIN 
Optometrist 



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50CV 



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The Newest: Style Clothing, Hats, 

and Furnishing for Men, Young 

Men and Students at most 

Popular prices. 

"IF MEN WEAR IT WE SELL IT" 

j C. C. FARR & CO. 

968 Broad Street Augusta, Ga. 



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Compliments of 




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"The Store of Better Values" 

1054 Broad Street 

3 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



HULL BARRETT & WILLINGHAM 

Attorneys at Law 









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Good! QriULCft Stoned 

Visit Any One of Our Convenient Stores 



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HTkene % One Wean ^ou" 



DRUGS 



CANDY 



CIGARS 



CIGARETTES 



Broad 


Marac//e s 
at the Monument 


Phone 


1500 


Broad 


—Lewis C5 KlMtve 
at Tenth Phone 


1775 


iLsXings ^JJl/'ay iJliarmacij 
Central Ave. at Kings Way Phone 


7678 


\_ollege J liaruiaci/ 
Walton Way at Crawford Ave. Phone 


603 


1432 


) {.ill sJ liarmaci) 
Monte Sano Avenue Phone 


bub\ 



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PERFUMES 



FOUNT 



TOILETURES 



Accuracy . . . 

Prompt Service . . . 

Quality Reliable . . . 












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A L L B I It > V O A I. ' 

"' CKVKTAL I <" K " 



l*ATHO\IZH 
A III/ IIS til iff A 

i out 4 it m /hi nt f 

100% ilontv industry 



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Pimm' 145-1 l« «:hs ciitist. 






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What a boij earns in the daq qoes 
into his pocket; What he spends 
ut niqht qoes into his 
(character 

\ M i<: It I < A » S F V T IT It E 
LIES IX ITS YOUTH. 

Augusta Area Council 

BOY SCOUTS of AMERICA 

I 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

Green's Garage 

Complete Service 

I 
Official AAA Service 

i 

125 Fifth St. Phone 1733 






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"*^* >A< >T >"< >^' >T -,n< >n< >n< >n< >A<-> 



For Picture Framing Go To |j 

, 

Harper s Art Store jj 

° ?< 

426 Eighth Street for !] 

° Frames of all Characters 
DIPLOMAS A SPECIALTY 



- ~~>^ " ' H i > f w t n. >r> < >n < > n < > n * > ni vr w i r^r 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

Blanchard & Calhoun (j 

o 

Realty Company 

o 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 



MARION BLDG. 



AUGUSTA, GA. (] 









-*f< "" ^"' *™' "•>' >"< »A< ^ ><*** *"' ^Q 



Sanitation is the first 
thing in Health 



Brown & Williamson s 

o 

Sanitary Barber Shop 

o 

CORNER 8rh &. BROAD STREETS 



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We will Appreciate Your Patronage 



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Ice Cream for 
all Occasions 



Grade AA Milk 
Certified 






Sanckerte 

Visit The South's Most Modern Dairy 

OLD SAVANNAH ROAD 



GEORGIA- CAROLINA DAIRIES 









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^"' >"' >"' >"< *r" *™' >^' *"' *"< "*' .n^^ 



J Compliments Of 

Augusta Lumber 
J Company 

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° Augusta Optical Company 



ROBERT ..W. ..GATLIN 
(Successor) 



Dependable Optical Service 

3 O 

! 8 

Masonic Bldg. Phone 2664 

> o 

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TREAT YOURSELF 
TO THE BEST 



Clary s Sanitary Barber Shop 



Marion Bldg., Lobby 



Augusta, Ga. 






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Bailie Furniture 
Company 

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712 Broad St. Auqusta, Ga- S 

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WHAT EVER YOU j 

UNDERTAKE DO IT WELL 






In difficult times when there is not work for all, only the 
more expert find jobs. Those who are expert in school 
work are generally most efficient in life. 

This Bank is an example of sticking to the job and mak- 

] ing a success of it . . . one hundred years in the business 

1 of banking. 

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! 

Georgia Railroad Bank & Trust Co. 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

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Aner me Uance or Alter 

-the Jnow lo (J/till s 

I hey always oo 



CHILI- --BEER. --SOD AS 

SANDWICHES 

HILL'S CAFE 



636 BROAD ST. 



CURB SERVICE 
















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ICE AND COAL COMPANY S 

"HOME OWNED" I 






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Lockhart, McAuliffe & Co. 

> (Incorporated) 

REAL ESTATE, FIRE AND 
CASUALTY INSURANCE, SURETY BONDS 

8C7 Broad Street 
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MAXWELL BROS. § 

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FURNITURE 



333-35 Broad Street Phone 4000 8 






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8 MARTIN CLOTHING 

COMPANY 

BETTER CLOTHES FOR LESS MONEY 

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982 Broad Street 
Augusta, Georgia 



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Modjeska Beauty Salon 

19-20 Johnson Building ° 

Miss Myrtle Daniels Prop. 

PHONE 772 U 



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Compliments Of 



Perkins Lumber 
Company 



620 13th Street 



Phone 711 






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McColloch's 

Walton Way Grocery 



Phone 4174-4173 



1728 Waiton Way 



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QUALITY SERVICE STORES. Inc. 



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City, oi J\\xcfc\xbka 






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DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELERY 

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Silverware and China 

o 

Expert Repair Service 

o 

| M. TANENBAUM 

Etablished 1905 

o 

974 Broad Street Phone 3581 Augusta. Ga. 

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Fresh Fruits and 
Vegetables at your Grocers 

Bailey Produce Co. 









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Compliments of 9 

DOCTORS and DENTISTS 
of Augusta 

MEMBERS U 

PHYSICIANS and DENTIST BUSINESS BUREAU, Inc. 



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5 Compliments of 

Rhodes-Harkins 
Furniture Company 

COMPLETE HOUSE 
FURNISHERS 



1051 Broad Street 



Augusta, Georgia 






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H. Schmerling 

"Quality Made Us Famous 
Service Made Us Grow" 



Trade with Augusta's Leading Jeweler 
910 Broad Street Phone 1101 



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^Jammink StucJio 



Portrait & Commercial Photographs 



737 Broad St. 



Phone 2314 



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Southern IDeldinq Companu 

J. A. OUTZ, Proprietor 

Electric and Acetylene Welding 

Auto Axles Straightned Cold, 

Wheels Aligned Accurately 

Augusta, Georgia 



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Bicycles and Motorcycles 



PAY AS YOU RIDE 



R. L. Sumerru & Son 



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DESIGNED AND PRINTED 
IN AUGUSTA BY 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING COMPANY 
Originators and Typographers 

747 Ellis Street Augusta, Georgia 






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TELEPHONE 151 624 BROAD STREET 

3 JEFFCOAT PLUMBING & HEATING Co. I 

(Incorporated) 

PLUMBING and HEATING CONTRACTORS 
REPAIR WORK A SPECIALTY 
Exclusive Agents for 
ELECTROL OIL BURNER S 

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QUALITY Augusta, Georgia SERVICE 

8 5 



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1 BOWEN BROS. ° !! 

l HARDWARE COMPANY | | Siarb'uiS florist | 

SPORTING GOODS HEADQUARTERS o 

° Baseba11 Footba11 s \ Flowers For All Occasions s 

Basketball and Tennis 



Supplies 
905 Broad Street 



Phone 7231 Metcalf at Walton Way 



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CITIZENS AND 

SOUTHERN 

NATIONAL BANK 



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BELK-WHITE CO 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, READY-TO-WEAR. 

CLOTHING, GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

AND SHOES 

843-845-847-849 Broad Street 
Augusta. Georgia 



i] Feedright Milling Co. 
^ 5 

"Your Friends Forever" s 



AUGUSTA- GEORGIA 












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COMPLIMENTS OF 

JENNINGS DRUG CO. 

Corner Broad and Marbury Streets 
PHONE 2415 AUGUSTA, GA. 



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Flint & Spires 

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Barber Shop 

FOR SERVICE [ 

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C. Etta Spires, Proprietor 

207 Ninth Street [ 






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PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
? Company 

LIFE ACCIDENT & HEALTH 
INSURAXXE 

O 

L. H. TURNER, Dist. Mgr. 

303-05 Masonic Building 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Doctor Reynolds 









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"MARILYN MODES FOR 
THE MODERN MISS" 



COMPLIMENTS 



Marilyn Slipper Shop 



852 Broad Street 



Reliable Transfer Company 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

SCROGGS and EWING 

ARCHITECTS 

Southern Finance Building 
Augusta, Georgia 



S. ALLEM COHEM 

District Manager 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INS. CO., OF NEW YORK 

Ninty-Two Years oi Service 
and Security. 






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NICHOLSON | 

BUICK COMPANY, Inc. ( 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Buick Pontiac 






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The None-Such Restaurant 

915 Broad Street I 

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Augusta's Most Up-to-Date Eating House 

Reasonable Prices 



Broad at Sixth Street 
Augusta, Georgia 



GUS A. SMARGADIS, Prop. 
Phone 171 






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LAND DRUG COMPANY 

BODEKER DRUG CO. 
(successors) 

1202 Broad Street Courtesy Corner 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST 

Expert Soda Fountain Service 

Cigars Drugs Cigarettes 

Drug Sundries Ccndy Cosmetics 

Courteous Service At All Times 



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3% INTEREST 
Paid on Savings and Time Deposits 

Insured Under Act U. S. Congress 1933, 
Amended 1934 Up to $5,000.00. 

Deposit Your Savings in a 
Savings Bank 

REALTY SAVINGS & TRUST CO. 

827 Broad Street Augusta.. Ga. 

Augusta's Only Strictly Savings Eank 



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J. C. PENNEY, CO., Inc. 



824 BROAD STREET 



"Si &ays 9o Gflop 9\l 9, 



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Lansdell's Florist 

We Specialize in Corsages 
and Wedding Bouquets 



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PHONE 1867 



1 BROAD ST. ° 



BOARDMAN OIL Co. 

An All Augusta Institution 1 






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Blue Holleman 



Dessie Miller' Jr. 



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Holleman -Miller Co. 

"OFFICE SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT" 

Augusta. Georgia 
Phone 4372 103 Eighth St. 



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JUNIOR COLLEGE 6- ACADEMY § 

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Senior Rinqs and Pins n 

FURNISHED BY 

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8 Herff-Jones Company j 

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We also serve a complete line of 

° 
Diplomas-Invitations-Cards 

Caps & Gowns-Trophies-Cups-Medals 

(1 ° 

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H. S. Canfield Georgia Rep. I56o No. Decatur Rd. Atlanta 

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WASH AT 



HULSE LAUN DRY 

"JUST A GOOD ONE" 

6871 ...PHONES... 513 



LAUNDRY 



DRY CLEANING 






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Compliments of 

LEAGUE. DUVALL & POWELL 
Real Estate and General Insurance 






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Compliments of 

LEE. CONGDON & FULCHER 
Attorneys at Law 



Augusta, Georgia 



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740-42 BROAD ST. 



AUGUSTA. GA. 



M EREDITH 



Optometrists 
& Opticians 

Optical service that satisfies 

DR. A. H. MEREDITH DR. R. W. ROPER 

PHONE 1765 






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Th 



National Exchange Bank 



Of 

Augusta Georgia 



Struma Sound! (Pnocpi£&&itf£ 



We Cordially Solicit Your Business 






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U Compliments of 

8 I 

Woodward Lumber 
Company 

1010 Roberts Street Phone 1163 

Augusta, Georgia 



Estab. 33 years 



"Where Quality and Quantity Go Hand 
in hand" 



GROCERIES and MEATS 



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DORR'S [ 

"GOOD TASTE APPAREL" 

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CLOTHIERS AND 
HABERDASHERS U 



724 Broad Street 



Augusta, Ga. 



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y T. D. Carey 



ESTABLISHED 1910 WARREN BoTHWELL 



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T. D. CAREY & COMPANY 



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TELEPHONE 918 138 EIGHTH STREET 

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Compliments of 



Imperial, Modjeska & Rialto 



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Amqukta Spantlna 

Qoadta Corrupariu 

EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS 



A('A»E»IY and .11 MOIt ( Ol I K.I ATHLETES mill 
si'll.lHXi. and UOLHSMITH ATHLETIC l.tft #/»»##•> / 

Golf, Tennis, Basketball, and Football Supplies 
Complete Fishing and Hunting Equipment 



212-14 Eighth Street 



Phone 3280 



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SUPERIOR LAUNDRY 

"ALL THAT THE NAME IMPLIES" 
Phone 762 1101 Fourth Street 



FIVE POINTS 
SERVICE STATION 

U. F. USRY 

Corner Hickman Road and Kings Way 
Phone No. 9416 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



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2 (incorporated) n ° 

COTTON FACTORS J 

S 18-20 JACKSON ST. AUGUSTA, GA. 2 



2 ESTABLISHED 1868 n o 






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WILLIFORD'S CLEANERS 

432 Eighth Street 

Phones 3 and 4 

A Clean Place To Clean Clothes 

BRANCH OFFICES AT YOUR DOOR 

1144 Broad Street Phone 800 

616 Broad Street Phone 2500 

1510 Walton Way 

1857 Central Avenue 

1907 Walton Way Phone 2077-W 

1122 9th Street Phone 9503 

Cash & Carry Delivery Service 



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Compliments Of 

A FRIEND 



H. E. WINGARD 

DEALER IN 

STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES 

1531 CENTRAL AVENUE 
Augusta, Georgia 






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WALKER-DuRANT MOTOR COMPANY, Inc. 




Broad at Fourteenth St 



WATCH THE FORDS GO BY" 

Ford and Lincoln Sales and Service 

Telephone 300 Augusta, Georgia 









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COMPLIMENTS OF 



R. E. ELLIOTT & Sons 






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Augusta Trucking 
Company 

Daily Service Between Atlanta and 
Augusta via Greensboro, Crawfords- 
ville, Warrenton, Thomson and Har- 
lem. All points in eastern parts of 
South Carolina. 

CARGOES FULLY INSURED 
PICK-UP SERVICE 
Augusta Phone Atlanta Phonea 

3316 Walnut 6812 



Stark- Empire 

Laundry Cleaning Dyeing 



Office 743 Broad St. Imperial Theatre Building 

Plant: Druid Park Ave. Phone 1811 

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u/ltk Qa& Appliance jj 

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Georgia Public Utilities Company 

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Your Hits 4 Company 



! Collegiate Clothes | 

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J. B. WHITE and COMPANY 



936 BROAD STREET 



PHONE 3500 












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| HARRY W. JERNIGAN jj 

y AGENTS 

o for 8 

Estate Heatrola 
Pee-Gee Paints 

1039 Broad Street Phone 219 U 

HARDWARE STOVES PAINTS (] 

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THE 

JONES 

FURNITURE 

COMPANY 



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Compliments Of 



S. H. KRESS & CO. 



1010 BROAD STREET 
Phone 2365 



Augusta. 



Georgia 



5c. 10c, & 25c STORE 



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AND ALERT FOR 
WORK OR PLAY 

Vv hen you feel a little tired. When you be- 
gin to lag. Drink an ice-cold Coca-Cola and 
you'll go breezing along again. It will re- 
fresh you. Keep a few bottles ready in 
your refrigerator. Order from your dealer. 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 



DRINK 



cca 



* ounce back 
to normal 



Augusta Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Telephone 33 



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COMPLIMENTS 
or 



Roofing SMetalWorks 

IrvcorporAl pd 



623 Reynolds St. Phone 4172 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 







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BOLYARD'S 

BARBER SHOP BEAUTY SHOP 

EXPERT SERVICE 



Hotel Richmond 



Augusta. Georgia 






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COMPLIMENTS OF 



Clothiers and 
Haberdashers 



HOTEL RICHMOND 



752 Broad St. 



Aueusta, Ga. 






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Central Gardens 

AUGUSTA'S OLDEST FLORIST WITH 
THE NEWEST IDEAS 

Walton Way At Heahd 






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COMPLIMENTS 



Bell Finance Co. 

H. O. Tabb, Manager 
222-23 Masonic Building 






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JOHN B. MURRAY Co. 

INSURANCE 
REAL ESTATE AMD LOANS 



122 Eighth Street 



Augusta. Gi. 



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GRADUATION and 

c 

GIFT BOOKS 

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Fountain Pens Kodaks and Films I 

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MURPHY STATIONERY 

COMPANY 



720 Broad Street 



Phone 1780 






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Merry Brick and Tile 

£BurU &fa P p y 9for.es (j 

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I MERRY BROTHERS BRICK & TILE COMPANY 



MANUFACTURES 



Marion Building 



Augusta, Georgia 



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Hansberger's 
Drug Store 

DRUGS — SODAS — CANDY 

Broad at Ninth Street 

Augusta, Georgia 






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COMPLIMENTS OF 



HEATH, BOLSTER & 



TURNER 



-WHOLESALE- 



FRUITS. PRODUCE, GROCERIES 

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Augusta. Georgia 

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COMPLIMENTS OF 



orrovetown Lumber Company 



GROVETOWN, GA. 






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COMPLIMENTS OF 



i^L'reaniland ^J heah 






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Compliments of 

o 

Wm. F. Law, Jr., Agent II 



Insurance 

o 

Phone 766 Augusta, Ga ° 

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The National Life and Accident Insurance Co. 

(Incorporated) 

Augusta, Georgia 
27-28 Johnson Building 

O. D. GORMAN, Supt. WILLIAM E. JAKES, Manager W. F. ADAMS- Supt. 

Janie Mixon, Cashier Mary Callahan, Asst. Cashier 

H. A. Shurley H. P. Odom 

V. E. Hamm W. A. Smith 

F. C. Edmunds R. G. Judy 

T. E. Story S. R. Smith 

S. E. Milhouse C. M. Schweers 

W. A. Bennett TUNE IN W S M EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM P. C. Barnard 









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Watch them go for Miik, Sugar and Fruit 
with this confection -like cereal! 

HERE'S a gay, exciting breakfast that does more to tempt appe- 
tites than a thousand words! 
Grains of wheat or rice puffed to 8 times their normal size. Luscious, 
dainty, full of nut-like flavor. Yet packed with nourishment that 
turns into energy like magic. 

Get Puffed Wheat or Puffed Rice from your grocer today. Your 
youngsters will be delighted with this amazing new series of package 
cut-outs. Twelve American Frontier sets. 92 beautiful full-color 
studies of heroes, animal life, and landscapes of twelve American 
episodes from Columbus to Kit Carson. Order today. 

THE QUAKER OATS COMPANY • CHICAGO 




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Protection 



Service 



INSURE WITH 



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Lorick, Hendee & Vaiden 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO. 

Southern Finiance Building 
Phone 41S 

Accident Health Life Group 






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HENRY DARLING, Inc. 






United States Government 
Bonds 

§ Georgia and South Carolina jj 
Municipals 

] Local and General Market 
Securities 



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Johnson, Lane, Space 
& Company, Inc. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

733 Broad Street 
Telephones 3047-3048 



AUGUSTA 

ATLANTA 

SAVANNAH 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Dye* ^oocll 
StoncA 



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THE AUGUSTA HERALD Bp 



U The ONE Paper The ONLY Paper 

o 

In Most Homes In Many Homes 

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HARLEY'S 

FANCY FAMILY 
GROCERIES 



We Specialize In 
DAY OLD EGGS 



HARLEY'S SPECIAL 

BLEND COFFEE 

Ground While You Wail 

PHONE 6716 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

MR. R. H. DANIEL 








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It is with grateful Appreciation that we extend 

our Sincere Thanks to the Advertisers 

that have made "The Rainbow" 

possible by Supporting it. 



-^ 



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